Kessler Foundation Marks 20th Anniversary of International Day of Persons with Disabilities

Through rehabilitation research and training, Kessler Foundation collaborates with partners here and abroad to further this year's focus of the UN's International Day of Persons with Disabilities – to remove barriers to create an inclusive and accessible society for all.

"Our collaborative rehabilitation research with partners in Europe and Asia is improving rehabilitation interventions for people with stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury and brain injury," said Rodger DeRose, president and CEO of Kessler Foundation. "Research at the Foundation encompasses outcomes and patient-oriented research studies that address fundamental public health issues of health disparities, community factors, cultural factors and disability prevention." With the help of generous grants, Kessler Foundation also provides postgraduate training for scientists from around the world, extending the influence of its rehabilitation research in cognition and mobility. Recent fellows have come from India, China, Italy, Russia, Croatia, and Belarus.

Foundation researchers work with scientists in China, where large numbers of people with disabilities are spread across vast areas in China, complicating access to needed rehabilitative care, according to John DeLuca, VP of Research & Training. "This new collaboration will help China develop the capability to remotely deliver effective rehabilitation based on Kessler Foundation's innovative use of technology in cognitive and mobility research," noted DeLuca. Initial efforts focus on developing a method for delivering cognitive rehabilitation to people with stroke.

In partnership with the Santa Lucia Foundation in Rome, the Foundation is expanding knowledge of the clinical course of multiple sclerosis. DeLuca, is exploring the Santa Lucia Foundation's extensive database of patients with multiple sclerosis, correlating clinical symptoms of multiple sclerosis with changes on functional MRI.

The Network for Spatial Neglect, founded in 2011 under the leadership of research scientist Peii Chen, and A.M Barrett, director of Stroke Rehabilitation Research at Kessler Foundation, enlists the help of scientists and clinicians around the world to lessen the impact of hidden disabilities such as spatial neglect on recovery from stroke. These hidden disabilities often hinder the ability of stroke survivors to think, learn, communicate, and navigate through the environment. Often overshadowed by readily recognizable disabilities like paralysis, hidden disabilities represent a significant challenge to recover.; Source: Kessler Foundation

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