Photo: Mitochondria and Lipids; Copyright: Hyun-eui Kim, UC Berkeley

Can some types of fat protect us from brain disease?

28/09/2016

An intriguing finding in nematode worms suggests that having a little bit of extra fat may help reduce the risk of developing some neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington's, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.
Read more
image:young woman at the treadmill; panthermedia/Pavel Maksimov

Graded aerobic treadmill testing in children & adolescents with sports-related concussion

28/09/2016

Graded aerobic treadmill testing is safe, tolerable, and useful in evaluating and managing cases of sports-related concussion in children and adolescents. This is the finding of a new study reported in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.
Read more
Photo: Three scientists standing in a row; Copyright: RUB, Kramer

Alzheimer's research: Poison in the brain

26/09/2016

The following factors facilitate the formation of putatively toxic structures in the neuronal nuclei of Alzheimer's patients. Spherical structures in the nucleus of nerve cells, so-called nuclear spheres, are suspected to trigger Alzheimer's disease.
Read more
Photo: Dr. Martin Fuhrmann; Copyright: DZNE/www.schmelz-fotodesign.de

Alzheimer’s: Cellular mechanism provides explanation model for declining memory performance

21/09/2016

Alzheimer’s disease triggers memory and learning disorders. To date, the causes are poorly understood. Now, researchers of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) are shedding light on a possible mechanism.
Read more
Photo: Elderly people prepare healthy food; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Joshua Resnick

Lower weight in late life may increase risk of Alzheimer's disease

07/09/2016

Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have found an association between lower weight and more extensive deposits of the Alzheimer's-associated protein beta-amyloid in the brains of cognitively normal older individuals.
Read more
Photo: Head CT of a patient ; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sudok1

Stopping exercise decreases brain blood flow

31/08/2016

New research led by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers examined cerebral blood flow in healthy, physically fit older adults before and after a 10-day period during which they stopped all exercise. Using MRI brain imaging techniques, they found a significant decrease in blood flow to several brain regions, after they stopped their exercise routines.
Read more