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MS: A Virus Similar to Herpes Could Be A Risk Factor

MS: A Virus Similar to Herpes Could Be A Risk Factor

The Epstein-Barr (EBV) virus –belonging to the herpes viruses family – is one of the environmental factors that might cause multiple sclerosis, a condition affecting the central nervous system, which causes are unknown. This has been confirmed by University of Granada scientists that analysed the presence of this virus in patients with multiple sclerosis.

Researchers analysed antibody levels, that is, antibodies that are produced within the central nervous system and that could be directly involved in the development of multiple sclerosis.

Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating condition affecting the central nervous system. Although the cause for this condition is unknown, patients with MS seem to have genetic vulnerability to certain environmental factors that could trigger this condition.

While other studies have tried to elucidate whether infection with the Epstein-Barr virus could be considered a risk factor in multiple sclerosis, what researchers did was conducting a meta-analysis of observational studies including cases and controls, aimed at establishing such association.

In a sample of 76 healthy individuals and 75 patients with multiple sclerosis, researchers sought a pattern that would show an association between this virus and multiple sclerosis. Thus, they determined the presence of antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus antigens synthesized within the central nervous system. Simultaneously, they identified viral DNA to measure antibody levels to EBV within the central nervous system, and the presence of EBV DNA respectively.

The researchers found a statistically significant association between viral infection and multiple sclerosis starting from the detection of markers that essentially indicate an infection in the past, while markers that indicate recent infection or reactivation are not relevant.

REHACARE.de; Source: University of Granada

- More about University of Granada at www.ugr.es

 
 

( Source: REHACARE.de )

 
 

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