Coronavirus: Precautions taken by Messe Düsseldorf

Covid-19: Accessibility of Messe Düsseldorf

Good reasons for REHACARE

Photo: Exhibitors in the field of adaptation of cars talking at REHACARE
Photo: Close-up of a woman wearing a hearing aid
Photo: Blue plastic head wearing virtual reality glasses
Photo: Man holding a hand prosthesis in his hand
Photo: Several trade visitors in suits talk to each other at REHACARE

Magazine: Year-round information portal on the topic of "Self-determined living"

Sigrun Passelat – That's how she rolls
People with impairments are not as efficient as people without impairments? Sigrun Passelat wants to eliminate this prejudice once and for all. To what extent she herself is a role model and how she otherwise rolls, she tells us on REHACARE.com.
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Sonja Böckmann – That's how she rolls
"Can't be done, doesn't exist" – Sonja Böckmann admires people with this attitude. In her opinion, no one should be disadvantaged due to illness or disability. Therefore, she herself also supports people and animals who need help. What she has always wanted to do and how she otherwise rolls, she tells us on REHACARE.com.
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Hanna Kern – That's how she rolls
More education about multiple sclerosis and other diseases and disabilities is not only necessary, it would also lead to more understanding and less prejudice. Hanna Kern is convinced of this. What she has always wanted to do and how she otherwise rolls, she tells us on REHACARE.com.
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Nele Handwerker – That's how she rolls
There are many things that make Nele Handwerker happy: her daughter, books and Fridays for Future. Why she, as Commissioner for the Disabled, would first of all start a survey, why she would like to be a cloud and and how she otherwise rolls, she tells us on REHACARE.com.
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Antje Thiel – That's how she rolls
Antje Thiel sees discriminatory language towards people with disabilities as a major problem in society. What she would do about it if she was the Commissioner for the Disabled, which bizarre hobby she pursues and how the type 1 diabetic otherwise rolls, she tells us on REHACARE.com.
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Janine Malik – That's how she rolls
Accessible living space that is not automatically more expensive than other apartments – Janine Mailk would ensure that this is the case if she was the Commissioner for the Disabled. What is also close to her heart, what makes her laugh and how she otherwise rolls, she tells us on REHACARE.com.
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Why inclusion is more important than ever amid the coronavirus crisis
How are families of children with disabilities coping during the coronavirus crisis? A recent online survey asked this question, prompting over 1,600 participants to respond in just two weeks. What do the survey results reveal about the current state of society in terms of social participation and inclusion? We asked Dorothea Kugelmeier and Dr. Raimund Schmolze-Krahn, who launched the study.
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ReWalk Robotics: Optimal supply thanks to the latest robotic technology
Rehabilitation and robotics increasingly go hand in hand. That’s why it is crucial to ensure the quality of robotic rehabilitation at any level. How important is it for companies like ReWalk Robotics to have the support of health insurance companies? REHACARE.com asked and also learned about the company’s future hopes for the industry.
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Neofect: "Digitization enabled us to gamify rehabilitation"
Light, individual and motivating: The portable therapy devices by Neofect aim to facilitate modern hand, arm and shoulder rehabilitation for rehab facilities and homecare use. We asked Scott Kim, CEO and co-founder of Neofect, to what extend gamification and digitization are advantages for the rehabilitation sector.
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Diversity and inclusion: Podcast breaks with the definition of "normal"
Diversity makes our society richer and stronger. That is why the podcast "Die Neue Norm" (English: The New Norm) does not center on people with disabilities but society as a whole – which includes people with disabilities. Once a month, the podcast features journalists Jonas Karpa, Judyta Smykowski and activist Raul Krauthausen as they discuss topics that move them, their listeners or society.
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Transfer boards by meinHOLTZ: "Assistive devices can be practical, modern and stylish at the same time"
Is it a skateboard with no wheels? No, it’s a transfer board made by meinHOLTZ! These modern boards help people who use wheelchairs to easily move from one surface to another on their own. Not only does this make transfers easy, but the assistive devices also look stylish and sophisticated.
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Online fashion show: Adaptive fashion for people with and without disabilities

COVID-19: numbers improve for workers with and without disabilities
The COVID economy continues in a state of flux, causing ongoing challenges for all workers, with and without disabilities, according to May's National Trends in Disability Employment (nTIDE) COVID Update, issued by Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire's Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD).
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Survey: alternative medicine widespread among people with MS
A new survey of more than 1,000 people with multiple sclerosis finds that an overwhelming majority use complementary and alternative medicine, with many using cannabis.
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Stay at home but do not stay still during the pandemic
In a review article published in the American Journal of Physiology, Brazilian researchers present scientific evidence on the impact of short periods of inactivity on the cardiovascular system and recommend exercise to stay fit at home during the pandemic.
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Superusers hold together health social media
New research looks at characteristics of superusers who are actively engaged in the Asthma UK online community and Facebook group to help healthcare professionals better understand the role they play in supporting the management of long-term conditions.
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3D printed insoles offer new hope for patients with diabetes
Scientists from Staffordshire University claim that new 3D printed insoles can significantly improve the foot health of people suffering with diabetes. This study offers hope for millions of patients with diabetes who are at risk of developing foot ulcers, which in many cases end up in amputation.
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A furry social robot can reduce pain and increase happiness
According to a new study by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers published in Scientific Reports, a one-time, hour-long session with a plush, seal-like social robot reduced pain and oxytocin levels, and increased happiness. The Japanese social robot, PARO, emits seal-like sounds and moves its head and flippers in response to being spoken to and touched.
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CGM reduces hypoglycemia in older adults with type 1 diabetes
Results from a six-month, multi-site clinical trial called the Wireless Innovation for Seniors with Diabetes Mellitus (WISDM) Study Group have been published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
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Tech tutorials for people with visual impairments
A research project that aims to help people that are blind or that have other visual impairments learn computer circuit design was recognized recently by a global conference on human-computer interaction.
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A shorter IQ test for children with special needs
For decades, neuropsychologists have used the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children test as the gold-standard intelligence quotient (IQ) test to determine the intellectual abilities of children with special needs. However, this comprehensive test can take up to 2 hours to complete, and many children with special needs have a difficult time participating in such long tests.
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Options to treat MS-related cognitive impairment evaluated
Experts in cognitive research evaluated the status of available treatments as well as promising strategies for treating cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis. The article, "Treatment and management of cognitive dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis", was published in Nature Reviews.
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App for evaluation and treatment of social communication skills in children
Researchers at the Universitat Jaume I (UJI) and the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) have developed PleaseApp, an application that aims to evaluate, dynamically assess and treat pragmatic and social communication skills in children aged 3 to 12 using an attractive, playful and child-friendly environment.
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Virtual reality to help stroke patients regain lost vision
Scientists from Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester aim to use virtual reality to help restore vision for people with stroke-induced blindness. The team of researchers led by Gabriel Diaz received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a method they believe could revolutionize rehabilitation for patients with cortically induced blindness.
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Diabetes: Patient data can predict life expectancy
A new study finds that clinicians can use patient data, such as a history of co-occurring health conditions and medication, to predict the 5- and 10-year life expectancy of older people with diabetes.
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A creative way to expand the geriatrics workforce
Experts suggest that our current geriatrics workforce needs better preparation to care for the 5.7 million people living with dementia in the U.S. To help meet this challenge, the Institute of Medicine has called for enhancing educational and training programs for improving the competence of the workforce.
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AI reduces communication gap for nonverbal people by as much as half
Researchers have used artificial intelligence to reduce the communication gap for nonverbal people with motor disabilities who rely on computers to converse with others. The team developed a new context-aware method that reduces this communication gap by eliminating between 50 percent and 96 percent of the keystrokes the person has to type to communicate.
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Many children in intensive care may not be getting rehabilitation therapy
Adult patients in hospital intensive care units (ICUs) are often given rehabilitation therapy and urged to keep mobile from an early point in their hospital stays. However, the prevalence or lack of rehabilitation practices for critically ill children in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) across the nation has been not been solidly researched. But a new study gives insights now.
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Time-saving high-intensity workouts can benefit people with spinal cord injuries
Research from the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University has found that the practical advantages of high-intensity interval training (HIIT), or short bursts of all-out exercise, could be especially beneficial for people who have experienced spinal cord injuries (SCI).
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COVID-19: Responding to challenges of older adults after infection
Older adults with COVID-19 who survive hospitalizations and return to their homes confront substantial health challenges and an unpredictable future. Early evidence suggests that complex and long-term physical, functional, cognitive, and emotional negative health consequences will be the norm for them.
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Mozart may reduce seizure frequency in people with epilepsy
A new clinical research study by Dr. Marjan Rafiee and Dr. Taufik Valiante of the Krembil Brain Institute at Toronto Western Hospital, part of University Health Network, has found that a Mozart composition may reduce seizure frequency in patients with epilepsy.
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Scientists develop world's first spherical artificial eye with 3D retina
An international team led by scientists at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has recently developed the world's first 3D artificial eye with capabilities better than existing bionic eyes and in some cases, even exceed those of the human eyes, bringing vision to humanoid robots and new hope to patients with visual impairment.
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Orthotics breakthrough helps children with cerebral palsy
Researchers have confirmed that adapting fine-tuned splints in combination with the footwear used by children with cerebral palsy to help them walk can decrease the energy they use by as much as 33 percent.
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Repetitive negative thinking linked to dementia risk
Persistently engaging in negative thinking patterns may raise the risk of Alzheimer's disease, finds a new UCL-led study. In the study of people aged over 55, published in Alzheimer's & Dementia, researchers found 'repetitive negative thinking' (RNT) is linked to subsequent cognitive decline as well as the deposition of harmful brain proteins linked to Alzheimer's.
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Stimulating research gives new treatment hope for Tourette Syndrome
Scientists from the University of Nottingham's School of Psychology and School of Medicine used repetitive trains of stimulation to the median nerve (MNS) at the wrist to entrain rhythmic electrical brain activity - known as brain-oscillations - that are associated with the suppression of movements.
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Coronavirus linked to stroke in otherwise healthy young people
Young patients with no risk factors for stroke may have an increased risk if they have contracted COVID-19, whether or not they are showing symptoms of the disease. Surgeons at Thomas Jefferson University and collaborators analyzed patients presenting with stroke from March 20th until April 10th at their institutions. The strokes they observed were unlike what they usually see.
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Rheumatic pain: increasingly more patients taking opioids
Fentanyl, tramadol or tilidine: New European figures show that even in Europe increasingly more people are taking opioids for pain connected with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases. Current analysis from Catalonia, Spain convincingly shows that the consumption of opioids in patients with osteoarthritis (OA/arthrosis) in 2007 to 2016 increased from 15 to 25 percent in all patients recorded.
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Visit Raccoon.Recovery at booth C33/Hall 6 – gamified rehabilitation after injuries and neurological diseases
Сome and see revolution in rehab: gamified tool for rehab planning, executing and monitoring. Only 30 exclusive items available for pre-order during the fair. Book your own now right on the booth C33,...
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ROTH MOBELI mobile handholds tested according to current standard 17966:2016 TÜV (Technical Inspection Agency)
ROTH MOBELI mobile hand grips have been TÜV SÜD tested since 2019 according to the current standard 17966:2016 and are now available with new higher maximum user weights. In ISO 17966:2016, an...
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A Tool that Affects the Senses
Among 700 exhibitors of the international trade fair, the interactive sound cushion inmu™ from Denmark is presented for the second time. The fair trade stand in Hall 4 / D23 attracts trade fair...
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World premiere at REHACARE 2019: Mobility Scooter "Champion 57"
Vintage Mobility develops mobility scooters that combine high functionality with timeless style. At REHACARE 2017, Vintage Mobility presented the "Gatsby", the world's first electric vehicle...
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Hase Bikes introduces the new Trets: Children's trike and therapeutic bike
Hase Bikes introduces the second generation of its multitalented children’s trike: The new Trets is even better, even cooler. The Trets from Hase Bikes is an ingenious therapeutic trike for...
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