REHACARE 2020 – Become an exhibitor!

Good reasons for REHACARE

Photo: Exhibitors in the field of adaptation of cars talking at REHACARE
Photo: Close-up of a woman wearing a hearing aid
Photo: Blue plastic head wearing virtual reality glasses
Photo: Man holding a hand prosthesis in his hand
Photo: Several trade visitors in suits talk to each other at REHACARE

Magazine: Year-round information portal on the topic of "Self-determined living"

Mario Harig – That's how he rolls
An accident at work changed Mario Harig's life and made him a pensioner at the age of 34. But for the trained scaffolder that was no reason to be bitter. Quite the opposite. Why he likes life and who his role model is, he tells us at REHACARE.com.
Read more
Kai Bosch – That's how he rolls
Kai Bosch lives out his love of language in every conceivable way – whether on stage, in book form or with music. But the Poetry Slamer also passes on his knowledge in workshops – for clubs, associations and in schools. The exchange with others is very important to him. Why this is so and how he rolls otherwise, he tells us at REHACARE.com.
Read more
Kira Dodillet – That's how she rolls
Invisible disabilities such as multiple sclerosis need more acceptance and attention in our society. Kira Dodillet is convinced of this. What else is very important to her and what she would probably shock her mother with, she tells us on REHACARE.com.
Read more
Björn Schnake – That's how he rolls
Björn Schnake is an incredibly talented table tennis player. Last year he played his way from zero to place eleven in the world ranking list in class seven of the standing athletes. His big dream is to participate at Tokyo 2020, but why he needs financial support and how he rolls when he is not playing, he tells us at REHACARE.com.
Read more
Kim Heinrich – That's how she rolls
At the age of 23, Kim Heinrich does not yet feel ready to take on such a responsible position as the Commissioner for the Disabled. But whom she would appoint as her advisor in this case and why the student appreciates unconditional honesty, she tells us at REHACARE.com.
Read more
WheelAir: No more overheating for wheelchair users
Overheating is a serious issue for people who use a wheelchair. Ice packs and water sprays used to help many of them in order to keep cool. But Corien Staels, Founder & Managing Director of WheelAir, wanted to find a technological solution for the problem of overheating. Since then the WheelAir concept is about to change lives.
Read more
Standing Ovation facilitates mobility at the workplace
Sitting while standing up – Standing Ovation makes this oxymoron possible. The rail system with its C-shaped seat bar and seat lifting unit allows Austrian chef Peter Lammer to sustain his job despite an 80 percent disability rating pertaining to his legs. With REHACARE.com he talked about the invention that brought back his zest for life and the feedback he received at this year's trade fair.
Read more
Mobility: Overcoming barriers with Wheelblades
Whether they are on vacation in the mountains or brave winter weather at home – people with mobility impairments want to take precautions to arrive safely at their destination. Patrick Mayer is personally affected by disability and developed two products that enable wheelchair and walking aid users to master these situations: Wheelblades and the SafetyFoot.
Read more
Adaptive eating utensils with a Twist: How Bravo Twist by ProWalk outsmarts Parkinson’s tremors
We all know that food intake is essential for the survival of every living organism. Yet for humans, food can also be a great source of pleasure or even love. At any rate, it is an important part of our social life. But what happens if our own body throws a monkey wrench into our food intake by having a stroke or neurological disorder?
Read more
Career launch made easy: customized support services for people with disabilities
Problems transitioning into the workforce? Adolescents with disabilities can get support from the North Rhine-Westphalian KAoA-STAR program. REHACARE.com sat down with the program coordinators of LVR (regional authority Rheinland) and LWL (regional authority Westfalen-Lippe), Eileen Witte and Johanna Korte, and asked about the program and the types of services it provides.
Read more

Where the sticks are dancing - Dergin Tokmaks fabulous crutches

Physiotherapy and rehabilitation today: digitalized and gamified

Supervisors share effective ways to include people with disabilities
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire, Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD), has authored a new article that describes the practices that employers use to facilitate the inclusion of employees with disabilities in their workplaces.
Read more
DIY tools help people with disabilities to communicate
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed do-it-yourself (DIY) assistive technology prototypes that are revolutionizing how people with disabilities can access tools that will help them interact with the world.
Read more
Type 1 diabetes: Time to consider standard care screenings
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München employed the world's first early detection test for type 1 diabetes in a large-scale population study in Bavaria, Germany, and investigated its effects. For the first time, screening for islet autoantibodies makes it possible to diagnose pre-symptomatic stages of type 1 diabetes.
Read more
I’mPOSSIBLE Award call for nominations launched
The Agitos Foundation has launched a call for nominations for the new I’mPOSSIBLE Award, which will be presented at the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games Closing Ceremony.
Read more
Eye-tracking data improves prosthetic hands
Prosthetic hands restore only some of the function lost through amputation. But combining electrical signals from forearm muscles with other sources of information, such as eye tracking, promises better prostheses. A study funded by the SNSF gives specialists access to valuable new data.
Read more
Parkinson’s patient treated with unique Deep Brain Stimulation device
In January, the neurosurgical department of the LMU University Hospital in Munich treated the first Parkinson's patient worldwide with a new neurostimulator, which enables better, more personalized care for patients. The new technology can possibly enable stimulation to be adjusted to the treatment requirements of different situations and therefore optimize treatment outcome.
Read more
Words matter when it comes to apparel for people living with disabilities
Retailers and brands such as Kohl's, Nike, Target, Tommy Hilfiger and Zappos have recently launched adaptive apparel lines, and economists have predicted that the U.S. adaptive clothing market could grow to $54.8 billion by 2023. However, brands should consider the language they use when marketing products to this group of consumers, according to a new study from the University of Missouri.
Read more
Cybathlon 2020: More than just a competition
On 2 - 3 May 2020, Zurich opens its doors for the second Cybathlon. In this unique championship, individuals with a disability, assisted by cutting-​edge technology, come to terms with the challenges of everyday life. Over 90 teams from around the world are battling it out in six disciplines.
Read more
Tokyo 2020 wheelchair basketball venue opened to public
The Ariake Arena, which will host the wheelchair basketball and volleyball events at the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic and Olympic Games, respectively, was inaugurated on Sunday (3 February) during a ceremony blending sports, culture and entertainment.
Read more
Accessible Airport Award applications are now open!
For the fifth year the European Disability Forum has launched the Accessible Airport Award in cooperation with Airport Council International Europe (ACI-Europe). The award celebrates airports in Europe that have achieved high level of accessibility as well as range and the quality of the assistance services to persons with disabilities.
Read more
Horseback riding can help children with ADHD and autism spectrum
Therapeutic horseback riding combined with brain-building exercises can improve the dexterity, coordination and strength of children with neurodevelopmental disorders, shows a new study.
Read more
Who receives advanced stroke care? It may depend on traffic
New study from the Keck School of Medicine of USC reveals that Los Angeles County's traffic patterns affect stroke care access.
Read more
Link between cognition and hearing or vision loss
There is a long-established and widely recognized link between declines in sensory acuity -- particularly hearing and vision -- and cognition. Data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA), involving tens of thousands of participants across the country aged 45 to 85, backs this up.
Read more
Better primary care needed to help young stroke survivors return to work
The role of primary care needs to be improved to help young stroke survivors return to work, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London and the University of Cambridge.
Read more
Traces of the European enlightenment found in the DNA of western sign languages
Sign languages throughout North and South America and Europe have centuries-long roots in five European locations, a finding that gives new insight into the influence of the European Enlightenment on many of the world's signing communities and the evolution of their languages.
Read more
Autism study finds later diagnoses for girls
A new study analyzing the first 1,000 participants in the Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment (RI-CART) identifies key trends in the presentation and diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder.
Read more
More autonomy at work reduces the risk of low back pain
A team of psychologists from Technische Universität Dresden has carried out a meta-analysis to identify psychosocial work factors that pose a risk for the development of chronic low back pain (CLBP). Their study clearly indicates that not only physical but also psychological and social factors exert considerable influence on the development of the disease.
Read more
Parents with terminally ill children tend to hide emotional pain
A study of families in Singapore with terminally ill children found that parents tend to defer discussing their psychological pain with their spouses to protect them from emotional distress.
Read more
Designing better nursing care with robots
Robots are becoming an increasingly important part of human care, according to researchers based in Japan. To help improve the safety and efficacy of robotic care, the scientists have developed a control method that could help robots better replicate human movement when lifting and moving a patient.
Read more
Aphasia: 'Reading' is easier than 'running'
Neurolinguists from HSE University have confirmed experimentally that for people with aphasia, it is easier to retrieve verbs describing situations with several participants (such as 'someone is doing something'), although such verbs give rise to more grammar difficulties.
Read more
Siblings of children with intellectual disabilities score high on empathy
The sibling relationship is the longest most people will enjoy in their lifetimes and is central to the everyday lives of children. A new Tel Aviv University and University of Haifa study finds that relationships between children and their siblings with intellectual disabilities are more positive than those between typically developing siblings.
Read more
Many older people's glasses of wrong power
Overall, Swedish 70-year-olds' eyesight is good, but many could see even better. Six in ten can improve their vision by getting eyeglasses or changing the power of the glasses they already have, according to a new study from the University of Gothenburg.
Read more
Neuropathy: early prevention of neuropathic pain
An unpleasant tingling in the hands and feet, numbness, furry and burning sensations – these symptoms may indicate a neuropathy, a disease of the nervous system. If the pain persists for several months, it is referred to as chronic pain. Researchers have found a way to prevent the development of neuropathic pain early on.
Read more
The impact of cars designed for kids with mobility issues
For the first month and a half after receiving a modified toy car designed for children with disabilities, the kids and their families seemed motivated to use driving as a means of exploration and socialization. What is needed to continue using the car after that time was researched by Sam Logan, a kinesiologist at Oregon State University.
Read more
AI can detect low-glucose levels via ECG
A new technique developed by researchers at the University of Warwick uses the latest findings of Artificial Intelligence to detect hypoglycaemic events from raw ECG signals, via wearable sensors and without requiring fingerprick tests.
Read more
Visit Raccoon.Recovery at booth C33/Hall 6 – gamified rehabilitation after injuries and neurological diseases
Сome and see revolution in rehab: gamified tool for rehab planning, executing and monitoring. Only 30 exclusive items available for pre-order during the fair. Book your own now right on the booth C33,...
Read more
ROTH MOBELI mobile handholds tested according to current standard 17966:2016 TÜV (Technical Inspection Agency)
ROTH MOBELI mobile hand grips have been TÜV SÜD tested since 2019 according to the current standard 17966:2016 and are now available with new higher maximum user weights. In ISO 17966:2016, an...
Read more
A Tool that Affects the Senses
Among 700 exhibitors of the international trade fair, the interactive sound cushion inmu™ from Denmark is presented for the second time. The fair trade stand in Hall 4 / D23 attracts trade fair...
Read more
World premiere at REHACARE 2019: Mobility Scooter "Champion 57"
Vintage Mobility develops mobility scooters that combine high functionality with timeless style. At REHACARE 2017, Vintage Mobility presented the "Gatsby", the world's first electric vehicle...
Read more
Hase Bikes introduces the new Trets: Children's trike and therapeutic bike
Hase Bikes introduces the second generation of its multitalented children’s trike: The new Trets is even better, even cooler. The Trets from Hase Bikes is an ingenious therapeutic trike for...
Read more