Photo: A boy from the back, so his cochlear implant is visible; Copyright: UT Dallas

Oral communication provides better outcomes for children with cochlear implants

21/06/2017

In a new, multisite study of deaf children with cochlear implants, UT Dallas researchers have found that children with either no exposure or limited exposure to sign language end up with better auditory, speaking and reading skills later. The paper is one of the first nationwide longitudinal studies of how sign language exposure affects young cochlear implant recipients.
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Photo: A young driver in a car with his friends; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jozef Polc

Teens with ADHD have lower crash risk than previously reported

21/06/2017

Adolescent drivers with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a 36 percent higher crash risk than other newly licensed teens. Although elevated, this risk is far lower than previous reports of being four times higher. This is the first large-scale study to provide detailed information on crash risk of adolescents with ADHD compared to other newly licensed young drivers.
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Photo: Man sitting in front of a robotic device; Copyright: UNIST

Stroke rehabilitation: Robotic device is helping patients to recover

19/06/2017

A recent study, affiliated with Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a new robotic tool for assessments of muscle overactivity and movement dysfunction in stroke survivors.
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Photo: A woman using sign language in front of her notebook; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monika Wisniewska

Human brain tunes into visual rhythms in sign language

19/06/2017

The human brain works in rhythms and cycles. These patterns occur at predictable frequencies. When people listen to speech, their brain waves lock up with the volume-based rhythms they hear. In a new study researchers of the University of Chicago designed an experiment using sign language to answer the question, if it works for visual rhythms in sign language too.
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Photo: An elderly man taking his dog for a walk; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Cathy Yeulet

Pet dogs could help older owners be more active

16/06/2017

Owning a dog may help older adults to meet physical activity levels recommended by the World Health Organisation, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health. Health professionals could encourage dog ownership or shared care of a dog to motivate older adults to be more physically active, researchers suggest.
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Photo: An elderly man with his family members in the backround; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Easing family distress: New international guidelines to identify dementia with Lewy bodies

14/06/2017

New guidelines have been published on the clinical and physical indicators to help ensure patients with dementia with Lewy bodies get an accurate diagnosis and the best care possible.
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Photo: A physician talking to a man and a woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vadimphoto1@gmail.com

Health care process - a roadblock for adolescents with autism and their caregivers

14/06/2017

For adolescents and young adults with autism, taking control of health care can be a barrier to independence. Now researchers from the University of Missouri have found that the health care process not only impacts adolescents with autism, but caregivers also feel they lack the skills and support necessary to help those adolescents achieve health-related independence.
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Photo: The prototype system of MIT researchers; Copyright: Courtesy of the researchers

Wearable system helps visually impaired users navigate

12/06/2017

Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed a new system that uses a 3-D camera, a belt with separately controllable vibrational motors distributed around it, and an electronically reconfigurable Braille interface to give visually impaired users more information about their environments.
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Photo: A 3D-animation of a home; Copyright: University of Stirling

New app to help improve environments for people living with dementia

12/06/2017

The University of Stirling's Dementia Services Development Centre (DSDC) has announced the development of a ground-breaking new app to help improve workplaces, public buildings and homes for people living with dementia.
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Photo: A prosthetic limb; Copyright: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Muscle grafts could help amputees sense and control artificial limbs

09/06/2017

A new surgical technique devised by MIT researchers could allow prosthetic limbs to feel much more like natural limbs. Through coordination of the patient’s prosthetic limb, existing nerves, and muscle grafts, amputees would be able to sense where their limbs are in space and to feel how much force is being applied to them.
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Photo: A brain Slice; Copyright: Courtesy of the researchers

Electrodes placed on the scalp could help patients with brain diseases

07/06/2017

Delivering an electrical current to a part of the brain involved in movement control has proven successful in treating many Parkinson’s disease patients. Now researchers have come up with a way to stimulate regions deep within the brain using electrodes placed on the scalp. This approach could make deep brain stimulation noninvasive, less risky, less expensive, and more accessible to patients.
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Photo: Katy Olesnavage with her prosthetic foot; Copyright: Bryce Vickmark

Collegiate inventors awarded with Lemelson-MIT Student Prize

07/06/2017

After a nationwide search for the most inventive college students the Lemelson-MIT Student Prize winners were announced. The Program awarded $115,000 in prizes to four undergraduate teams and five individual graduate inventors. The winners of this year’s competition were selected from a diverse and highly competitive applicant pool of students from colleges and universities across the country.
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Photo: A hand-prosthesis holding an egg; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf / Constanze TillmannMichigan State University

First-of-its-kind study shows how hand amputation, reattachment affect brain

05/06/2017

When a person loses a hand to amputation, nerves that control sensation and movement are severed, causing dramatic changes in areas of the brain that controlled these functions. As a result, those brain-areas take on other functions. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have found evidence of specific neurochemical changes associated with lower neuronal health in these brain regions.
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Photo: Kinesiologist David Ferguson and IndyCar Driver Charlie Kimball; Copyright: Derrick Turner / Michigan State University

How an IndyCar driver is outpacing diabetes

05/06/2017

New Michigan State University research is the first to help a professional race car driver with diabetes improve his performance during competition, helping him capture two top five finishes at the Indianapolis 500.
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Photo: A Labrador retriever; Copyright: MU College of Veterinary Medicine

Study reveals recommendations for certifying emotional support animals

26/05/2017

Service animals help owners navigate daily tasks and often have years of training to help them serve disability-related functions. However, little consensus exists when it comes to the certification of "emotional support animals" (ESAs). These animals usually have little or no specific training, which poses a challenge for mental health professionals who are asked to certify them.
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Photo: A person standing barefoot; Copyright: panthermedia.net / plepraisaeng

Severe foot pain linked to recurrent falls

24/05/2017

Researchers from Hebrew Senior Life's Institute for Aging Research have discovered that foot pain - particularly severe foot pain - correlates to a higher incidence of recurrent falls. This finding also extends to those diagnosed with planus foot posture (flat feet), indicating that both foot pain and foot posture may play a role in falls among older adults.
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Photo:older man hugging his wife ; Copyright: Florida Atlantic University

FAU study and new tool proves 'all is not lost' to dementia

24/05/2017

In marriage, good communication is key to a fulfilling and enduring relationship. For people with dementia, communicating needs, emotions and interacting with others becomes increasingly difficult as communication deteriorates as dementia progresses.
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Photo: Elderly women and an elderly man; Copyright: Baycrest Health Sciences

Dementia-related brain changes observed before problems are noticeable

22/05/2017

University of Toronto and Baycrest Rotman Research Institute (RRI) scientists have discovered a potential brain imaging predictor for dementia, which illustrates that changes to the brain's structure may occur years prior to a diagnosis, even before individuals notice their own memory problems.
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Photo: Man walking using wireless signal; Copyright: Jason Dorfman, MIT CSAIL

MIT wireless device can see through walls to detect walking speed

10/05/2017

In a new paper, the team presents "WiGait," a device that can measure the walking speed of multiple people with 95 to 99 percent accuracy using wireless signals. By measuring this emerging vital sign, system could help monitor and diagnose health issues like cognitive decline and cardiac disease. The system is an update of a device that Katabi's team presented to President Obama in 2015.
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Photo: Dr. Vladimir Hachinski; Copyright: Western University

Stroke prevention may also reduce dementia

10/05/2017

A new paper by researchers at Western University, Lawson Health Research Institute and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) shows there's been a decade-long drop in new diagnoses of both stroke and dementia in the most at-risk group - those who are 80 or older.
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Photo: Young woman smiles while talking to another woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/javiindy

Invisible disability: You can’t be what you can’t see

01/03/2017

When they hear the word “disability“ many people immediately think of people in wheelchairs and perhaps of the blind or people with amputated limbs. In other words, people usually associate visible impairments with this term. Yet not every disability can be recognized at first glance – and sometimes not even at a second glance.
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Image: Collage with portraits from people with Down's syndrome; Copyright: beta-web/Dindas

Touchdown: People with Down's syndrome teach

01/12/2016

People with Down's syndrome are not accepted by all of society. That's something "Touchdown" – the world’s first exhibition about and by people with Down's syndrome – wants to change in the Art and Exhibition Hall of the Federal Republic of Germany (Bundeskunsthalle) in Bonn. The project was initiated by people with and without trisomy 21.
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Photo: Marcus Rohrbach cuts fruits in kitchen, camera records scenes, computer screen in foreground

Will software automatically describe movie plots in the near future?

18/07/2016

In order to understand the plot of a movie an audio version is very helpful for visually impaired people. Authors watch the whole movies and describe what happens in each scene. But wouldn’t it be possible for a computer software to do this kind of work? Researchers work on developing a program which automatically generates movie descriptions and reads them out.
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Intelligent mobility assistants support the elderly

01/02/2016

Obstacles such as cobblestone streets, sloping paths or other barriers make the lives of senior citizens difficult. The more restricted they are in their mobility, the less they dare to do things. Then they often avoid going to their favorite park at the corner. The Assistants for Safe Mobility (ASSAM) project created intelligent solutions for walkers, wheelchairs and adult three-wheelers.
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"Many people underestimate the economic impact of accessible tourism in Europe"

01/04/2015

There is a market for accessible travelling in Europe. Yet it only grows very slowly. But actually there is a huge demand, like a study has recently proved. So what do people with access needs really require? And what does the travel industry have to offer – already today and in future?
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