Photo: Physician telling his patient the osteoporosis diagnosis with showing her a x-ray image of her knees; Copyright: Max Planck Institute For Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Individualized therapy for patients with osteoporosis

12/11/2018

More than six million people in Germany suffer from osteoporosis. The disease is characterized by chronic bone resorption, leading to frequent fractures as a consequence of the bone loss. Research partners in the OsteoSys project are working toward customized, personalized treatment.
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Photo: Female participant wearing the helmet in presence of a scientist; Copyright: Ingo Rappers/Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research

ERC Synergy Grant for new therapeutic brain stimulation project

07/11/2018

German, Finnish and Italian scientists working on a helmet to provide spatial and temporal high-resolution brain stimulation to treat stroke, depression and Alzheimer's disease.
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Photo: A man programming and operating a robotic arm; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mihajlo Maricic

Robotic arm may help to rehabilitate chronic stroke victims

07/11/2018

New research published in Frontiers in Neurology finds that robotic arm rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients with aphasia, the loss of ability to understand or express speech, may promote speech and language function recovery.
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Photo: A screaming man in front of a grey wall, against which figures are drawn, screaming at him.; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Siphotography

Social stigma contributes to poor mental health in the autistic community

05/11/2018

Stress related to social stigma may be the reason why autistic people experience more mental health problems than the general population, dispelling past theories that the condition itself is the origin of such distress.
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Photo: Elderly man outdoors taking some wooden stairs in a forrest; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Older adults with strong grip, good memory may avoid or delay disability

05/11/2018

As we age, we may develop certain disabilities that make it difficult to walk, climb, balance, or maintain our fine motor skills. In turn, these changes can affect our ability to perform routine, daily tasks, which can lead to a loss of independence and reduced quality of life. However, experts say that it is often possible to treat these difficulties before they lead to disability.
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Photo: seven volunteers of telephone counseling on a group picture; Copyright: Hospital for Special Surgery

Study shows volunteering benefits those with lupus

31/10/2018

Conventional wisdom has it that volunteering is good for you, and a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) shows that to be true for people with lupus volunteering in a peer support and education program.
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Photo: Robotic service assistant in a hospital hallway; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA

"SeRoDi" research project presents final results

29/10/2018

As part of the "SeRoDi" project ("Service Robotics for Personal Services"), Fraunhofer IPA collaborated with other research and application partners to develop new service robotics solutions for the nursing sector. The resulting robots, the "intelligent care cart" and the "robotic service assistant", were used in extensive real-world trials in a hospital and at two care homes.
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Photo: John DeLuca; Copyright: Kessler Foundation

Researchers propose conceptual framework to study role of exercise in multiple sclerosis

29/10/2018

Researchers have proposed a conceptual framework for examining the relationship between exercise and adaptive neuroplasticity in the population with multiple sclerosis (MS).
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Photo: Elderly couple using a tablet computer; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imtmphoto

Social media buffers depression among older adults with pain

26/10/2018

In a newly published University of Michigan study, researchers reported that using social media can reduce the negative health effects of curtailed social contact that comes as a consequence of pain.
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Photo: A group of teenagers playing basketball; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

How teens with type 1 diabetes can guard their hearts

24/10/2018

People with type 1 diabetes are far more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than those without diabetes. Their risks climb even higher if they show signs of hypertension (high blood pressure) or dyslipidemia (unhealthy levels of cholesterol or triglycerides).
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Photo: A geriatric nurse sitting between eldlerly ladies and watches pictures with them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Elderly housing with supportive social services can reduce hospital use

24/10/2018

Investing in affordable housing that offers supportive social services to senior citizens on Medicare has the potential to reduce hospital admissions and the amount of time needing inpatient hospital care by better managing chronic health conditions, according to a Rutgers study.
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Photo: Elderly woman with a hearing problem who is taking a hearing test and may be receiving a hearing aid.; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kzenon

Hearing and visual aids linked to slower age-related memory loss

22/10/2018

Hearing aids and cataract surgery are strongly linked to a slower rate of age-related cognitive decline, according to new research by University of Manchester academics.
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Photo: Selective focus of designer and colleagues working behind in office; Copyright: panthermedia.net/EdZbarzhyvetsky

Thinking outside the box: Adults with ADHD not constrained in creativity

22/10/2018

People often believe those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder face challenges that could hinder future employment, but a University of Michigan study found that adults with ADHD feel empowered doing creative tasks that could help them on the job.
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Photo: A fiberoptic cable attached to a wristband which measures the chemical composition of skin and extract the amount of glucose; Copyright: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Researchers show effectiveness of new noninvasive blood glucose test

17/10/2018

For those living with diabetes, monitoring blood glucose accurately is necessary to prevent diabetes-related complications such as heart attacks, blindness and coma. Researchers from the MU and MIT recently evaluated the accuracy of an MIT-developed technology to monitor blood glucose levels without needles or a finger prick.
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Photo: A physician talking to her patient and explaining him what he can see on her computer screen; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Hispanic individuals benefit from skills-based stroke prevention intervention

17/10/2018

A culturally tailored program used when discharging stroke patients from the hospital helped to lower blood pressure among Hispanic individuals one year later, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU College of Global Public Health.
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Photo: Monica Zaring, who has Saul-Wilson syndrome, as a child and today; Copyright: Sanford Burnham Prebys

Solving a medical mystery: Cause of rare type of dwarfism discovered

15/10/2018

For children born with Saul-Wilson syndrome, and their parents, much of their lives are spent searching for answers. First defined in 1990, only 14 cases are known worldwide. And the cause of the syndrome - characterized by short stature, microcephaly (small head), hearing loss and early developmental delays - remained unknown. Today, these individuals have answers.
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Photo: In the center, surgeon wachting right to a x-ray; Copyright: Tomsk Oblast Clinical Hospital

Inverted exoskeleton for early rehabilitation after stroke

15/10/2018

Robotics scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University together with physicians from Tomsk Oblast Clinical Hospital are developing a robotic complex for early rehabilitation of immobilized patients after stroke.
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Photo: Senior woman greeting female care worker making home visit; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monkeybusiness Images

New geriatrics research offers roadmap to 'revolutionary change' for person-centered care

10/10/2018

Published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS), two new research articles and a corresponding commentary from preeminent geriatrics leaders describe ways to make person-centered care more actionable for older people.
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Photo: Sleeping male ind the bed; Copyright: panthermedia.net/santypan

Sleeping too much or too little may affect stroke risk differently based on race

10/10/2018

How many hours people sleep at night may affect their risk of stroke differently based on race, according to a study published in the online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Photo: Woman exercising in the gym; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Exercise reduces stress, improves cellular health in family caregivers

08/10/2018

Exercising at least three times a week for six months reduced stress in a group of family caregivers and even appeared to lengthen a small section of their chromosomes that is believed to slow cellular aging, new UBC research has found.
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Graphic: Part of the American Geriatrics Society White Paper Executive Summary; Copyright: 2018, American Geriatrics Society

New report on mobility has experts moving toward consensus on care as we age

08/10/2018

Experts at the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) unveiled a list of recommendations to help health systems prioritize a vital function for us all as we age: mobility. Mobility refers to our ability to move freely and easily (on our own or with assistance).
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Photo: elderly couple laughing while being at a christmas market; Copyright: panthermedia.net/DGLimages

MS researchers find well-being differs with age in multiple sclerosis

01/10/2018

A study by researchers from NYU and Kessler Foundation shows that with aging, individuals with MS exhibit less severe depressive symptoms and better quality of life.
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