Photo: The bandage reveals its measurings under UV light; Copyright: Empa/CSEM

Bandage with a voice

17/07/2017

A novel bandage alerts the nursing staff as soon as a wound starts healing badly. Sensors incorporated into the base material glow with a different intensity if the wound’s pH level changes. This way even chronic wounds could be monitored at home.
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Photo: A nurse measuring the blood pressure of a patient in a nursing home; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Diego Cervo

Serious pain afflicts a third of nursing home residents in last six months of life

17/07/2017

Many nursing home residents have a fairly pain-free experience until the end of life, but at least a third suffer persistent, significant pain during their last six months, according to a new study from the University of Manitoba, University of British Columbia and University of Alberta that could have implications for end-of-life care in Canada.
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Photo: Comparison between sighted and blind athletes who just lost a match for a medal; Copyright: Bob Willingham

Do blind people express their emotions in the same way as people who can see?

14/07/2017

Facial expressions play a powerful role in social interactions from birth to adulthood. Fear, joy, anger - all our emotions are articulated and understood thanks to universal codes. Common sense sees this enterprise as an act of imitation. But if this is the case, does the same hold true for people who were born blind? Do they show their emotions in the same way?
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Image: talking to a doctor about cost; Copyright: University of Michigan

Older Americans don't get - or seek - enough help from doctors & pharmacists on drug costs

12/07/2017

The majority of Americans over age 50 take two or more prescription medicines to prevent or treat health problems, and many of them say the cost weighs on their budget, a new poll finds.
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Photo: a woman sitting on a bench and checking on her insulin; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

Diabetes patients still produce insulin

10/07/2017

A 'brain training' game developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge could help improve the memory of patients in the very earliest stages of dementia, suggests a study published in The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology.
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Photo: a man sitting on his veranda, reading the newspaper and drinking his coffee; Copyright: panthermedia.net/londondeposit

Leisure activities lower blood pressure in Alzheimer's caregivers

05/07/2017

Going for a walk outside, reading, listening to music - these and other enjoyable activities can reduce blood pressure for elderly caregivers of spouses with Alzheimer's disease, suggests a study published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Photo: hands of an elderly person are holding a rosary; Copyright: panthermedia.net/agneskantaruk

Older people who feel close to God have well-being that grows with frequent prayer

05/07/2017

As people grow older, those who are securely attached to God are more likely to have a sense of well-being - and the more frequently they pray, the greater that feeling, according to a Baylor University study. But those who feel more distant from God do not receive the same benefit.
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Photo: One person ist wearing the Wearable and another person is holding it in his hand; Copyright: University of Texas at Dallas

Bioengineers create wearable diagnostic biosensor for diabetes monitoring

03/07/2017

Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas are getting more out of the sweat they've put into their work on a wearable diagnostic tool that measures three diabetes-related compounds in microscopic amounts of perspiration.
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Photo: Hand of an elderly person petting a therapy dog; Copyright: Dominick Reuter for Tufts University

Could therapy animal visitation pose health risks at patient facilities?

30/06/2017

A survey of United States hospitals, eldercare facilities and therapy animal organizations revealed their health and safety policies for therapy animal visits varied widely, with many not following recommended guidelines for animal visitation.
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Photo: Professor Ng Tze Pin is watching three old ladys playing a game ; Copyright: National University of Singapore

Parameters that can reverse physical frailty in the elderly

26/06/2017

Physical frailty is common among the elderly and is strongly associated with cognitive impairment, dementia and adverse health outcomes such as disability, hospitalisation, and mortality. A four-year study conducted by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) showed that a combination of nutritional, physical and cognitive interventions can reverse physical frailty.
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Photo: A man and a woman having eye contact, their child is watching them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/RomanPashkovsky

Researchers explore why people with autism avoid eye contact

26/06/2017

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder often find it difficult to look others in the eyes. Many say that looking others in the eye is uncomfortable or stressful for them all of which points to a neurological cause than just to a sign of social and personal indifference. Now, a team of researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital has shed light on the brain mechanisms involved in this behavior.
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Photo: A young driver in a car with his friends; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jozef Polc

Teens with ADHD have lower crash risk than previously reported

21/06/2017

Adolescent drivers with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a 36 percent higher crash risk than other newly licensed teens. Although elevated, this risk is far lower than previous reports of being four times higher. This is the first large-scale study to provide detailed information on crash risk of adolescents with ADHD compared to other newly licensed young drivers.
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Photo: A woman using sign language in front of her notebook; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monika Wisniewska

Human brain tunes into visual rhythms in sign language

19/06/2017

The human brain works in rhythms and cycles. These patterns occur at predictable frequencies. When people listen to speech, their brain waves lock up with the volume-based rhythms they hear. In a new study researchers of the University of Chicago designed an experiment using sign language to answer the question, if it works for visual rhythms in sign language too.
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Photo: An elderly man with his family members in the backround; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Easing family distress: New international guidelines to identify dementia with Lewy bodies

14/06/2017

New guidelines have been published on the clinical and physical indicators to help ensure patients with dementia with Lewy bodies get an accurate diagnosis and the best care possible.
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Photo: A physician talking to a man and a woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vadimphoto1@gmail.com

Health care process - a roadblock for adolescents with autism and their caregivers

14/06/2017

For adolescents and young adults with autism, taking control of health care can be a barrier to independence. Now researchers from the University of Missouri have found that the health care process not only impacts adolescents with autism, but caregivers also feel they lack the skills and support necessary to help those adolescents achieve health-related independence.
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Photo: A prosthetic limb; Copyright: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Muscle grafts could help amputees sense and control artificial limbs

09/06/2017

A new surgical technique devised by MIT researchers could allow prosthetic limbs to feel much more like natural limbs. Through coordination of the patient’s prosthetic limb, existing nerves, and muscle grafts, amputees would be able to sense where their limbs are in space and to feel how much force is being applied to them.
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Photo: A brain Slice; Copyright: Courtesy of the researchers

Electrodes placed on the scalp could help patients with brain diseases

07/06/2017

Delivering an electrical current to a part of the brain involved in movement control has proven successful in treating many Parkinson’s disease patients. Now researchers have come up with a way to stimulate regions deep within the brain using electrodes placed on the scalp. This approach could make deep brain stimulation noninvasive, less risky, less expensive, and more accessible to patients.
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Photo: Katy Olesnavage with her prosthetic foot; Copyright: Bryce Vickmark

Collegiate inventors awarded with Lemelson-MIT Student Prize

07/06/2017

After a nationwide search for the most inventive college students the Lemelson-MIT Student Prize winners were announced. The Program awarded $115,000 in prizes to four undergraduate teams and five individual graduate inventors. The winners of this year’s competition were selected from a diverse and highly competitive applicant pool of students from colleges and universities across the country.
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Photo: A hand-prosthesis holding an egg; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf / Constanze TillmannMichigan State University

First-of-its-kind study shows how hand amputation, reattachment affect brain

05/06/2017

When a person loses a hand to amputation, nerves that control sensation and movement are severed, causing dramatic changes in areas of the brain that controlled these functions. As a result, those brain-areas take on other functions. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have found evidence of specific neurochemical changes associated with lower neuronal health in these brain regions.
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Photo: Kinesiologist David Ferguson and IndyCar Driver Charlie Kimball; Copyright: Derrick Turner / Michigan State University

How an IndyCar driver is outpacing diabetes

05/06/2017

New Michigan State University research is the first to help a professional race car driver with diabetes improve his performance during competition, helping him capture two top five finishes at the Indianapolis 500.
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