Photo: A man and a woman having eye contact, their child is watching them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/RomanPashkovsky

Researchers explore why people with autism avoid eye contact

26/06/2017

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder often find it difficult to look others in the eyes. Many say that looking others in the eye is uncomfortable or stressful for them all of which points to a neurological cause than just to a sign of social and personal indifference. Now, a team of researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital has shed light on the brain mechanisms involved in this behavior.
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Photo: Professor Ng Tze Pin is watching three old ladys playing a game ; Copyright: National University of Singapore

Parameters that can reverse physical frailty in the elderly

26/06/2017

Physical frailty is common among the elderly and is strongly associated with cognitive impairment, dementia and adverse health outcomes such as disability, hospitalisation, and mortality. A four-year study conducted by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) showed that a combination of nutritional, physical and cognitive interventions can reverse physical frailty.
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Photo: A young driver in a car with his friends; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jozef Polc

Teens with ADHD have lower crash risk than previously reported

21/06/2017

Adolescent drivers with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a 36 percent higher crash risk than other newly licensed teens. Although elevated, this risk is far lower than previous reports of being four times higher. This is the first large-scale study to provide detailed information on crash risk of adolescents with ADHD compared to other newly licensed young drivers.
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Photo: A woman using sign language in front of her notebook; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monika Wisniewska

Human brain tunes into visual rhythms in sign language

19/06/2017

The human brain works in rhythms and cycles. These patterns occur at predictable frequencies. When people listen to speech, their brain waves lock up with the volume-based rhythms they hear. In a new study researchers of the University of Chicago designed an experiment using sign language to answer the question, if it works for visual rhythms in sign language too.
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Photo: An elderly man with his family members in the backround; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Easing family distress: New international guidelines to identify dementia with Lewy bodies

14/06/2017

New guidelines have been published on the clinical and physical indicators to help ensure patients with dementia with Lewy bodies get an accurate diagnosis and the best care possible.
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Photo: A physician talking to a man and a woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vadimphoto1@gmail.com

Health care process - a roadblock for adolescents with autism and their caregivers

14/06/2017

For adolescents and young adults with autism, taking control of health care can be a barrier to independence. Now researchers from the University of Missouri have found that the health care process not only impacts adolescents with autism, but caregivers also feel they lack the skills and support necessary to help those adolescents achieve health-related independence.
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Photo: A prosthetic limb; Copyright: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Muscle grafts could help amputees sense and control artificial limbs

09/06/2017

A new surgical technique devised by MIT researchers could allow prosthetic limbs to feel much more like natural limbs. Through coordination of the patient’s prosthetic limb, existing nerves, and muscle grafts, amputees would be able to sense where their limbs are in space and to feel how much force is being applied to them.
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Photo: A brain Slice; Copyright: Courtesy of the researchers

Electrodes placed on the scalp could help patients with brain diseases

07/06/2017

Delivering an electrical current to a part of the brain involved in movement control has proven successful in treating many Parkinson’s disease patients. Now researchers have come up with a way to stimulate regions deep within the brain using electrodes placed on the scalp. This approach could make deep brain stimulation noninvasive, less risky, less expensive, and more accessible to patients.
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Photo: Katy Olesnavage with her prosthetic foot; Copyright: Bryce Vickmark

Collegiate inventors awarded with Lemelson-MIT Student Prize

07/06/2017

After a nationwide search for the most inventive college students the Lemelson-MIT Student Prize winners were announced. The Program awarded $115,000 in prizes to four undergraduate teams and five individual graduate inventors. The winners of this year’s competition were selected from a diverse and highly competitive applicant pool of students from colleges and universities across the country.
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Photo: A hand-prosthesis holding an egg; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf / Constanze TillmannMichigan State University

First-of-its-kind study shows how hand amputation, reattachment affect brain

05/06/2017

When a person loses a hand to amputation, nerves that control sensation and movement are severed, causing dramatic changes in areas of the brain that controlled these functions. As a result, those brain-areas take on other functions. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have found evidence of specific neurochemical changes associated with lower neuronal health in these brain regions.
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Photo: Kinesiologist David Ferguson and IndyCar Driver Charlie Kimball; Copyright: Derrick Turner / Michigan State University

How an IndyCar driver is outpacing diabetes

05/06/2017

New Michigan State University research is the first to help a professional race car driver with diabetes improve his performance during competition, helping him capture two top five finishes at the Indianapolis 500.
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Photo: An hiking elderly man; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Viktor Cap

Exercising can protect the brain from Alzheimer's disease

31/05/2017

The evidence is clear. Physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, says a panel of researchers and not-for-profit leaders, led by the University of British Columbia's Okanagan campus.
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Photo: A doctor checking up a kid; Copyright: American Thoracic Society

Prenatal air pollution exposure and stress increase childhood asthma risk

29/05/2017

A new study has found that children, especially boys, whose mothers were exposed to higher levels of outdoor particulate air pollution at the same time that they were very stressed were most likely to develop asthma by age six.
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Photo:older man hugging his wife ; Copyright: Florida Atlantic University

FAU study and new tool proves 'all is not lost' to dementia

24/05/2017

In marriage, good communication is key to a fulfilling and enduring relationship. For people with dementia, communicating needs, emotions and interacting with others becomes increasingly difficult as communication deteriorates as dementia progresses.
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Photo: A person standing barefoot; Copyright: panthermedia.net / plepraisaeng

Severe foot pain linked to recurrent falls

24/05/2017

Researchers from Hebrew Senior Life's Institute for Aging Research have discovered that foot pain - particularly severe foot pain - correlates to a higher incidence of recurrent falls. This finding also extends to those diagnosed with planus foot posture (flat feet), indicating that both foot pain and foot posture may play a role in falls among older adults.
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Photo: Elderly women and an elderly man; Copyright: Baycrest Health Sciences

Dementia-related brain changes observed before problems are noticeable

22/05/2017

University of Toronto and Baycrest Rotman Research Institute (RRI) scientists have discovered a potential brain imaging predictor for dementia, which illustrates that changes to the brain's structure may occur years prior to a diagnosis, even before individuals notice their own memory problems.
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Photo: A technician is showing the patient how he is able to self-administer the electrical stimulation; Copyright: Alain Herzog

Stroke patients take the lead in their rehabilitation

15/05/2017

Every year, 17 million people worldwide suffer strokes, and a third are left paralyzed on one side of their body. But current rehabilitation solutions are not always effective in improving mobility declines after the first few months. This is where the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) startup Intento comes in with a new device that can help patients regain mobility in their arms.
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