Overview: News

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Photo: A boy at the speech therapist's; Copyright: panthermedia.net / belchonock

Speech impairment in five-year-old international adoptees with cleft palate

18.09.2019

Could a chemical produced by the brain that regulates mood, sleep and breathing also be protective in people with epilepsy? New research has found that higher levels of serotonin in the blood after a seizure are linked to a lower incidence of seizure-related breathing problems called apneas, when a person temporarily stops breathing.
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Photo: A man tries out shared control with the robotic arm.; Copyright: 2019 EPFL / Alain Herzog

A smart artificial hand for amputees merges user and robotic control

18.09.2019

EPFL scientists are developing new approaches for improved control of robotic hands – in particular for amputees – that combines individual finger control and automation for improved grasping and manipulation. This interdisciplinary proof-of-concept between neuroengineering and robotics was successfully tested on three amputees and seven healthy subjects.
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Photo: woman taking a deep breath; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Antonio Guillen Fernández

Why do some people stop breathing after seizures?

16.09.2019

Could a chemical produced by the brain that regulates mood, sleep and breathing also be protective in people with epilepsy? New research has found that higher levels of serotonin in the blood after a seizure are linked to a lower incidence of seizure-related breathing problems called apneas, when a person temporarily stops breathing.
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Photo: a man with a leg prothesis goes to sports; Copyright: panthermedia.net / ArturVerkhovetskiy

Feeling legs again improves amputees' health

16.09.2019

While walking, people with intact legs feel when they move their knee or when their feet touch the ground. The nervous system constantly draws on sensory feedback of this sort to precisely control muscles. People using a leg prosthesis, however, do not know precisely where the prosthesis is located, how it is moving, or what type of terrain it is standing on.
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Photo: two girls measure their size; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Monkeybusiness Images

Study shows shorter people are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes

13.09.2019

Short stature is associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes).Tall stature is associated with a lower risk, with each 10cm difference in height associated with a 41 percent decreased risk of diabetes in men and a 33 percent decreased risk in women.
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