Photo: a person learning to walk with the help of an exosceleton; Copyright: Fangshi Zhu, PhD/UTHealth

Robot-assisted therapy can help treat stroke survivors

20/09/2021

Exoskeleton-assisted rehabilitation can be beneficial in treating stroke survivors, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
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Photo: image of a lower leg prothesis and how the magnets are placed inside the prothesis; Copyright: MIT Media Lab

Magnets could offer better control of prosthetic limbs

01/09/2021

For people with amputation who have prosthetic limbs, one of the greatest challenges is controlling the prosthesis so that it moves the same way a natural limb would. Most prosthetic limbs are controlled using electromyography, a way of recording electrical activity from the muscles, but this approach provides only limited control of the prosthesis.
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Photo: A bionic hand touches holographic elements in the air; Copyright: PantherMedia/vitaliy_sokol

The future of prosthetics is here thanks to Artificial Intelligence and bionic feedback

31/08/2021

There are many exciting advances in the field of prosthetics. REHACARE.com asked prosthetic manufacturers and experts about the latest medical and technical research in laboratories and discovered how prostheses quite literally learn from the user.
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Photo: a white robotic hand holding a cupcake; Copyright: Xuanhe Zhao, Shaoting Lin, et al

Inflatable robotic hand gives amputees real-time tactile control

23/08/2021

For the more than 5 million people in the world who have undergone an upper-limb amputation, prosthetics have come a long way. Beyond traditional mannequin-like appendages, there is a growing number of commercial neuroprosthetics – highly articulated bionic limbs, engineered to sense a user's residual muscle signals and robotically mimic their intended motions.
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Photo: Mother talking to her daughter sitting at a table opposite her brother; Copyright: Andi Weiland | Gesellschaftsbilder.de

Why inclusion is more important than ever amid the coronavirus crisis

25/06/2020

How are families of children with disabilities coping during the coronavirus crisis? A recent online survey asked this question, prompting over 1,600 participants to respond in just two weeks. What do the survey results reveal about the current state of society in terms of social participation and inclusion? We asked Dorothea Kugelmeier and Dr. Raimund Schmolze-Krahn, who launched the study.
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Photo: Prototype of the sensor for a cane; Copyright: Zahout-Heil

SmAccLab: Smart auxiliary means for everyone

28/05/2019

Accessible and realistic – that’s how auxiliary aids should be in the eyes of Professor Carsten Zahout. Students at the Smart Accessibility Laboratory (SmAccLab) are working on technical solutions that fulfill these requirements and lead to increased participation for people with disabilities. REHACARE.com found out how product engineering and inclusion join forces.
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Photo: An elderly woman catches ichó. The ball starts to glow in red-orange colors.; Copyright: ichó systems - icho-systems.de

"ichó brings people with and without dementia together and provides a way to share stories, experiences, and impressions."

22/04/2018

Like the golden sphere in the fairy tale of the Frog King, ichó (Greek for echo) is meant to bring back lost motor skills and cognitive functions to people with dementia. The project of four former graduates of the Düsseldorf University of Applied Sciences aims to offer individual support through a person’s favorite music or fairy tale.
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Photo: Cinderella and Niels of HelpCamps; Copyright: HelpCamps

HelpCamps: "Making assistive technology faster, more affordable and personalized"

23/11/2017

In accordance with the slogan "Nothing about us without us", the HelpCamps project aims at developing and implementing concepts and ideas together. To make this a reality, people with disabilities, companies from the assistive technology, care and assistance sectors, as well as stakeholders in the so-called maker movement and researchers, are brought together to network during various events.
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Photo: Marcus Rohrbach cuts fruits in kitchen, camera records scenes, computer screen in foreground

Will software automatically describe movie plots in the near future?

18/07/2016

In order to understand the plot of a movie an audio version is very helpful for visually impaired people. Authors watch the whole movies and describe what happens in each scene. But wouldn’t it be possible for a computer software to do this kind of work? Researchers work on developing a program which automatically generates movie descriptions and reads them out.
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