Image: woman in the dark in front of a luminous screen; Copyright: Maxwell Photography

New research could help predict seizures before they happen

19.06.2019

A new study has found a pattern of molecules that appear in the blood before a seizure happens. This discovery may lead to the development of an early warning system, which would enable people with epilepsy to know when they are at risk of having a seizure.
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Image: Dr. Steven Kahn talks with RISE participant Faamafi Faamafi Jr.; Copyright: Christopher Pacheco, VA Puget Sound Health Care System

Improvements in insulin release wane after treatment stops in adults with type 2 diabetes

19.06.2019

A set of clinical trials examining youth and adults with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance has found that disease progression in adults slowed during medical treatment but resumed after treatment stopped. Youth on the same treatment had markedly poorer outcomes with continued disease progression both during and after the treatment.
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Image: two boys each raising one arm and holding a small baseball with the inscription “Diabetes TrialNet” in their other hand; Copyright: Benaroya Research Institute

Drug delays type 1 diabetes in people at high risk

17.06.2019

A treatment affecting the immune system effectively slowed the progression to clinical type 1 diabetes in high risk individuals, according to findings from National Institutes of Health-funded research. The study is the first to show that clinical type 1 diabetes can be delayed by two or more years among people who are at high risk.
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Image: woman in the lab uses a synthetic model to demonstrate how the spinal load simulator works; Copyright: Elvira Eberhardt / Uni Ulm

EU project 'iPSpine': Spinal disc under scrutiny

17.06.2019

Back pain is one of the leading causes for disability around the world. With a total of 15 million euros for five years, the European Union is funding a major European project which is radically breaking new ground in the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The 'iPSpine' project, coordinated by Utrecht University, combines innovative biomaterials with stem cell-based approaches.
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Photo: Laughing little boy with wristbands holding his hands to his forehead; Copyright: Catherine Hoyt

Wearable motion detectors identify motor deficits in children

14.06.2019

A wristwatch-like motion-tracking device can detect movement problems in children whose impairments may be overlooked by doctors and parents, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
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Image: Olaia Martinez; Copyright: Nuria González, UPV/EHU

Texture-modified foods for people with dysphagia

12.06.2019

The UPV/EHU's LaTex has spent the last 10 years developing its research projects in the field of diet adaptation for the group of people who have dysphagia. The Food Hydrocolloids journal has just published a piece of research entitled 'Sensory perception and flow properties of dysphagia thickening formulas with different composition'.
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Photo: elderly woman in a wheelchair holding a rattle; Copyright: Care UK

Advancing dementia and its effect on care home relationships

12.06.2019

As dementia advances, in most cases it can change the behaviour displayed by those with the condition. Such changes in behaviour can bring strain to a wide-ranging network of relationships – from those between people with dementia and their professional carers or between those with dementia and their families – which in turn can affect the delivery of care.
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Photo: Senior with fall risk; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Enigmangels

Home exercise program: Reducing of falling in seniors

10.06.2019

An in-home exercise program reduced subsequent falls in high-risk seniors by 36 per cent, according the results of a 12-month clinical trial published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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Photo: Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles; Copyright: Ricardo Carrasco III

Diabetes: Study improves medication adherence of Latinos

10.06.2019

Latino adults have higher diabetes rates than non-Latinos, yet research shows they are less likely to follow medication instructions. Furthermore, diabetes can set off medical complications, that create a challenging daily regimen. In a study coming out of the Keck School of Medicine of USC, student researchers have identified several potential approaches for improving medication adherence.
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Photo: Mother gives pills to her child; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Dmyrto Z

Type 1 diabetes: Holidays disrupt drug routines

07.06.2019

Children with type 1 diabetes find it difficult to adhere to their drug routines during school holidays and weekends. Holiday distractions cause a 20 percent reduction in adherence to taking medications that assist managing their condition and other associated conditions, which may have serious consequences for their health.
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Photo: Illustration of the experiment designed to assess initiation of joint attention in infancy; Copyright: Pär Nyström

Infants later diagnosed with autism seldom initiate joint attention

05.06.2019

In typical development, both infants and their parents flexibly use verbal and non-verbal behaviors to establish frequent episodes of joint attention. A new study published in Biological Psychiatry shows that infants who are later diagnosed with autism react adequately when others initiate joint attention, but seldom actively seek to establish such episodes themselves.
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Photo: Elderly man sitting at the table and listening to music from radio with headset while reading a newspaper; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Vaicheslav

Assistance systems: AI radio for people with dementia

05.06.2019

Radio Me will address key causes of hospital admission for people with dementia, such as agitation and not taking medication correctly. As a result, it is hoped quality of life will improve, and people will be able to remain living independently at home for longer.
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Image: Man with a prosthetic foot is walking over an obstacle course; Copyright: Stanford University

Towards a more stable, efficient prosthetic foot

03.06.2019

Taking on a hiking trail or a cobblestone street with a prosthetic leg is a risky proposition – it is possible, but even in relatively easy terrain, people who use prostheses to walk are more likely to fall than others.
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Photo: Teenagers driving in a car; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Teens with ADHD get more traffic violations for risky driving

29.05.2019

Teen drivers diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are significantly more likely to crash, be issued traffic and moving violations, and engage in risky driving behaviors than their peers without ADHD, according to a Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) study published in the journal Pediatrics.
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Photo: Man in a sports wheelchair; Copyright: panthermedia.net/apid

Study shows universities’ lacklustre sports offer for people with disabilities

29.05.2019

Spanish professors have guided the study "Sport Practice among University Students with Disabilities: Barriers, Facilitating Factors and Employability", presented in Madrid. Among the conclusions of this work, the UMH professors highlight that less than 20 percent of Spanish universities offer sport activities for students with disabilities.
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Photo: Prototype of the sensor for a cane; Copyright: Zahout-Heil

SmAccLab: Smart auxiliary means for everyone

28.05.2019

Accessible and realistic – that’s how auxiliary aids should be in the eyes of Professor Carsten Zahout. Students at the Smart Accessibility Laboratory (SmAccLab) are working on technical solutions that fulfill these requirements and lead to increased participation for people with disabilities. REHACARE.com found out how product engineering and inclusion join forces.
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Photo: Footage from virtual reality headset; Copyright: University of Cambridge

Virtual reality can spot navigation problems in early Alzheimer's disease

27.05.2019

Virtual reality (VR) can identify early Alzheimer's disease more accurately than 'gold standard' cognitive tests currently in use, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. The study highlights the potential of new technologies to help diagnose and monitor conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, which affects more than 525,000 people in the UK.
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Photo: Screenshots of the cognitive training game; Copyright: Tohoku University

Cognitive training game to improve driving skills among the elderly

27.05.2019

Researchers at Tohoku University have developed a new cognitive training game aimed at improving road safety among elderly drivers. The game, "Cognitive Training for Car Driving" (CTCD), requires only a set top box and a TV, and for users to play it regularly.
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Photo: Ngawai Moss holding her child on her arms; Copyright: Queen Mary University of London

New tool to predict epileptic seizures in pregnancy could save lives

22.05.2019

A new risk calculator for pregnant women with epilepsy, developed by researchers from Queen Mary University of London, has been found to accurately predict the risk of seizures during pregnancy and up to six weeks after delivery, and could save the lives of mothers and babies.
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Photo: Researchers in front of a computer using eye tracking technology; Copyright: Birmingham City University

Increasing participation in the workplace by speech recognition and eye-tracking technology

22.05.2019

Microsoft and Birmingham City University are developing new technology to help people with disabilities become more independent in the workplace. As a grantee of Microsoft’s AI for Accessibility program, Birmingham City University is developing a prototype technology system that enables people with limited mobility to control computers using voice commands and the movement of their eyes.
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Photo: Work schedule patching approach; Copyright: Ellen Ernst Kossek/Purdue University

A work patch for better nursing home care

20.05.2019

Placing a loved one in a nursing home can be a traumatic experience for the entire family with concerns about the care and attention they will receive. Imagine if those concerns were eased, simply by some changes in the way the schedules are done for the staff at that facility.
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Photo: Smartphone showing the eAsthma Tracker App on the display; Copyright: Bryan Stone

Children using asthma tracking app have better disease control

20.05.2019

An app that allows parents and doctors to monitor a child's asthma has a big impact on managing the disease. When families monitored symptoms with eAsthma Tracker and adjusted care accordingly, children had better asthma control and made fewer visits to the emergency department.
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Photo: Carl W. Baker, M.D., during a vision control with a study participant; Copyright: Brooksie Beard

Still having good vision? Waiting can be reasonable for patients with diabetes

08.05.2019

People with good vision despite having center-involved diabetic macular edema can safely forego immediate treatment of their eye condition as long as they are closely monitored, and treatment begins promptly if vision worsens, according to clinical trial results.
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Photo: Senior woman spinning on a exercise bike in a gym; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Exercise activates memory neural networks in older adults

06.05.2019

How quickly do we experience the benefits of exercise? A new University of Maryland study of healthy older adults shows that just one session of exercise increased activation in the brain circuits associated with memory - including the hippocampus - which shrinks with age and is the brain region attacked first in Alzheimer's disease.
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Photo: Pregnant couple looking at a digital tablet computer while laying on the couch; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ArturVerkhovetskiy

Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at risk of giving birth prematurely

06.05.2019

Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of delivering their baby prematurely. The risk increases as blood sugar levels rise, however women who maintain the recommended levels also risk giving birth prematurely. These are the findings from researchers at Karolinska Institutet and the Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden.
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Photo: An elderly woman catches ichó. The ball starts to glow in red-orange colors.; Copyright: ichó systems - icho-systems.de

"ichó brings people with and without dementia together and provides a way to share stories, experiences, and impressions."

22.04.2018

Like the golden sphere in the fairy tale of the Frog King, ichó (Greek for echo) is meant to bring back lost motor skills and cognitive functions to people with dementia. The project of four former graduates of the Düsseldorf University of Applied Sciences aims to offer individual support through a person’s favorite music or fairy tale.
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Photo: Cinderella and Niels of HelpCamps; Copyright: HelpCamps

HelpCamps: "Making assistive technology faster, more affordable and personalized"

23.11.2017

In accordance with the slogan "Nothing about us without us", the HelpCamps project aims at developing and implementing concepts and ideas together. To make this a reality, people with disabilities, companies from the assistive technology, care and assistance sectors, as well as stakeholders in the so-called maker movement and researchers, are brought together to network during various events.
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Photo: Marcus Rohrbach cuts fruits in kitchen, camera records scenes, computer screen in foreground

Will software automatically describe movie plots in the near future?

18.07.2016

In order to understand the plot of a movie an audio version is very helpful for visually impaired people. Authors watch the whole movies and describe what happens in each scene. But wouldn’t it be possible for a computer software to do this kind of work? Researchers work on developing a program which automatically generates movie descriptions and reads them out.
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