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Aerobic exercise programs may improve endurance after stroke
Stroke survivors who completed group-based aerobic exercise programs similar in design and duration to cardiac rehabilitation programs significantly improved their aerobic endurance and walking ability, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association.
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Diabetes treatment targets have not improved in the US since 2005
More than 30 million Americans are living with diabetes. Diabetes treatment is generally focused on controlling blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol level, as well as promoting smoking cessation. A new study by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) suggests that the achievement of these targets has not improved for U.S. adults with diabetes since 2005.
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Regular exercise may slow decline in those at risk of Alzheimer's
Moderate exercise is not only good for memory as people age, it also appears to help prevent the development of physical signs of Alzheimer's, known as biomarkers, in those who are at risk for the disease, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.
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A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots
Soft robots have a distinct advantage over their rigid forebears: they can adapt to complex environments, handle fragile objects and interact safely with humans. Made from silicone, rubber or other stretchable polymers, they are ideal for use in rehabilitation exoskeletons and robotic clothing. Soft bio-inspired robots could one day be deployed to explore remote or dangerous environments.
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Reduced carbohydrate intake improves type 2 diabetics' ability to regulate blood sugar
Patients with type 2 diabetes improve their ability to regulate blood sugar levels if they eat food with a reduced carbohydrate content and an increased share of protein and fat. This is shown by a recent study conducted at Bispebjerg Hospital in collaboration with Aarhus University and the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at the University of Copenhagen.
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Robotic neck brace dramatically improves functions of ALS patients
A novel neck brace, which supports the neck during its natural motion, was designed by Columbia engineers. This is the first device shown to dramatically assist patients suffering from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) in holding their heads and actively supporting them during range of motion.
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Most seniors with dementia live at home
Contrary to popular belief, most older Americans with advancing dementia remain in their own homes - many until they die. But a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco has revealed that this population may endure more pain and have more complex or unaddressed medical needs than their counterparts in nursing homes.
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Care for people with learning disabilities needs improving
Professor Tuffrey-Wijne, the world’s first researcher to conduct studies into palliative care for people with learning disabilities, told policymakers and leading thinkers in the field at the Death, Dying and Learning Disability lecture that improvement in end of life care given to people with learning disabilities is desperately needed.
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Positive effect of music and dance on dementia
Stereotypically viewed as passive and immobile, a University of Otago, New Zealand, pilot study has shown the powerful influence music and dance can have on older adults with dementia.
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Tokyo 2020 to be transformational
The Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games will transform Japanese society and significantly raise awareness of and advance the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) according to the International Paralympic Committee’s (IPC) Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Craig Spence.
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