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Kids with headache after stroke might be at risk for another stroke
A new study has found a high incidence of headaches in pediatric stroke survivors and identified a possible association between post-stroke headache and stroke recurrence. Headache developed in over a third of participating children, on average six months after the stroke. Fifteen percent of patients had another stroke, typically in the first six to 12 months after the initial stroke.
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Increasing workforce diversity is critical for addressing healthcare disparities
It is common for patients to prefer seeking care from a clinician similar to them who can relate to their experiences and make treatment plans that work better for their lives. To meet these preferences from patients and improve quality of care, a diverse clinician workforce that matches the diversity in the general population is needed.
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Promising treatment for shoulder pain in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury
A New Jersey team of researchers has reported the successful, long-term relief of chronic refractory shoulder pain in a wheelchair user with spinal cord injury (SCI) following a single injection of autologous, micro-fragmented adipose tissue into the affected shoulder joint.
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New research could help predict seizures before they happen
A new study has found a pattern of molecules that appear in the blood before a seizure happens. This discovery may lead to the development of an early warning system, which would enable people with epilepsy to know when they are at risk of having a seizure.
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Improvements in insulin release wane after treatment stops in adults with type 2 diabetes
A set of clinical trials examining youth and adults with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance has found that disease progression in adults slowed during medical treatment but resumed after treatment stopped. Youth on the same treatment had markedly poorer outcomes with continued disease progression both during and after the treatment.
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Drug delays type 1 diabetes in people at high risk
A treatment affecting the immune system effectively slowed the progression to clinical type 1 diabetes in high risk individuals, according to findings from National Institutes of Health-funded research. The study is the first to show that clinical type 1 diabetes can be delayed by two or more years among people who are at high risk.
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EU project 'iPSpine': Spinal disc under scrutiny
Back pain is one of the leading causes for disability around the world. With a total of 15 million euros for five years, the European Union is funding a major European project which is radically breaking new ground in the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The 'iPSpine' project, coordinated by Utrecht University, combines innovative biomaterials with stem cell-based approaches.
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Wearable motion detectors identify motor deficits in children
A wristwatch-like motion-tracking device can detect movement problems in children whose impairments may be overlooked by doctors and parents, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
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Texture-modified foods for people with dysphagia
The UPV/EHU's LaTex has spent the last 10 years developing its research projects in the field of diet adaptation for the group of people who have dysphagia. The Food Hydrocolloids journal has just published a piece of research entitled 'Sensory perception and flow properties of dysphagia thickening formulas with different composition'.
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Advancing dementia and its effect on care home relationships
As dementia advances, in most cases it can change the behaviour displayed by those with the condition. Such changes in behaviour can bring strain to a wide-ranging network of relationships – from those between people with dementia and their professional carers or between those with dementia and their families – which in turn can affect the delivery of care.
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