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Superusers hold together health social media
New research looks at characteristics of superusers who are actively engaged in the Asthma UK online community and Facebook group to help healthcare professionals better understand the role they play in supporting the management of long-term conditions.
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3D printed insoles offer new hope for patients with diabetes
Scientists from Staffordshire University claim that new 3D printed insoles can significantly improve the foot health of people suffering with diabetes. This study offers hope for millions of patients with diabetes who are at risk of developing foot ulcers, which in many cases end up in amputation.
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A furry social robot can reduce pain and increase happiness
According to a new study by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers published in Scientific Reports, a one-time, hour-long session with a plush, seal-like social robot reduced pain and oxytocin levels, and increased happiness. The Japanese social robot, PARO, emits seal-like sounds and moves its head and flippers in response to being spoken to and touched.
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CGM reduces hypoglycemia in older adults with type 1 diabetes
Results from a six-month, multi-site clinical trial called the Wireless Innovation for Seniors with Diabetes Mellitus (WISDM) Study Group have been published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
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Tech tutorials for people with visual impairments
A research project that aims to help people that are blind or that have other visual impairments learn computer circuit design was recognized recently by a global conference on human-computer interaction.
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A shorter IQ test for children with special needs
For decades, neuropsychologists have used the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children test as the gold-standard intelligence quotient (IQ) test to determine the intellectual abilities of children with special needs. However, this comprehensive test can take up to 2 hours to complete, and many children with special needs have a difficult time participating in such long tests.
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Options to treat MS-related cognitive impairment evaluated
Experts in cognitive research evaluated the status of available treatments as well as promising strategies for treating cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis. The article, "Treatment and management of cognitive dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis", was published in Nature Reviews.
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App for evaluation and treatment of social communication skills in children
Researchers at the Universitat Jaume I (UJI) and the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) have developed PleaseApp, an application that aims to evaluate, dynamically assess and treat pragmatic and social communication skills in children aged 3 to 12 using an attractive, playful and child-friendly environment.
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Virtual reality to help stroke patients regain lost vision
Scientists from Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester aim to use virtual reality to help restore vision for people with stroke-induced blindness. The team of researchers led by Gabriel Diaz received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a method they believe could revolutionize rehabilitation for patients with cortically induced blindness.
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Diabetes: Patient data can predict life expectancy
A new study finds that clinicians can use patient data, such as a history of co-occurring health conditions and medication, to predict the 5- and 10-year life expectancy of older people with diabetes.
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A creative way to expand the geriatrics workforce
Experts suggest that our current geriatrics workforce needs better preparation to care for the 5.7 million people living with dementia in the U.S. To help meet this challenge, the Institute of Medicine has called for enhancing educational and training programs for improving the competence of the workforce.
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AI reduces communication gap for nonverbal people by as much as half
Researchers have used artificial intelligence to reduce the communication gap for nonverbal people with motor disabilities who rely on computers to converse with others. The team developed a new context-aware method that reduces this communication gap by eliminating between 50 percent and 96 percent of the keystrokes the person has to type to communicate.
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Many children in intensive care may not be getting rehabilitation therapy
Adult patients in hospital intensive care units (ICUs) are often given rehabilitation therapy and urged to keep mobile from an early point in their hospital stays. However, the prevalence or lack of rehabilitation practices for critically ill children in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) across the nation has been not been solidly researched. But a new study gives insights now.
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Time-saving high-intensity workouts can benefit people with spinal cord injuries
Research from the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University has found that the practical advantages of high-intensity interval training (HIIT), or short bursts of all-out exercise, could be especially beneficial for people who have experienced spinal cord injuries (SCI).
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COVID-19: Responding to challenges of older adults after infection
Older adults with COVID-19 who survive hospitalizations and return to their homes confront substantial health challenges and an unpredictable future. Early evidence suggests that complex and long-term physical, functional, cognitive, and emotional negative health consequences will be the norm for them.
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Mozart may reduce seizure frequency in people with epilepsy
A new clinical research study by Dr. Marjan Rafiee and Dr. Taufik Valiante of the Krembil Brain Institute at Toronto Western Hospital, part of University Health Network, has found that a Mozart composition may reduce seizure frequency in patients with epilepsy.
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Scientists develop world's first spherical artificial eye with 3D retina
An international team led by scientists at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has recently developed the world's first 3D artificial eye with capabilities better than existing bionic eyes and in some cases, even exceed those of the human eyes, bringing vision to humanoid robots and new hope to patients with visual impairment.
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Orthotics breakthrough helps children with cerebral palsy
Researchers have confirmed that adapting fine-tuned splints in combination with the footwear used by children with cerebral palsy to help them walk can decrease the energy they use by as much as 33 percent.
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Repetitive negative thinking linked to dementia risk
Persistently engaging in negative thinking patterns may raise the risk of Alzheimer's disease, finds a new UCL-led study. In the study of people aged over 55, published in Alzheimer's & Dementia, researchers found 'repetitive negative thinking' (RNT) is linked to subsequent cognitive decline as well as the deposition of harmful brain proteins linked to Alzheimer's.
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Stimulating research gives new treatment hope for Tourette Syndrome
Scientists from the University of Nottingham's School of Psychology and School of Medicine used repetitive trains of stimulation to the median nerve (MNS) at the wrist to entrain rhythmic electrical brain activity - known as brain-oscillations - that are associated with the suppression of movements.
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Coronavirus linked to stroke in otherwise healthy young people
Young patients with no risk factors for stroke may have an increased risk if they have contracted COVID-19, whether or not they are showing symptoms of the disease. Surgeons at Thomas Jefferson University and collaborators analyzed patients presenting with stroke from March 20th until April 10th at their institutions. The strokes they observed were unlike what they usually see.
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Rheumatic pain: increasingly more patients taking opioids
Fentanyl, tramadol or tilidine: New European figures show that even in Europe increasingly more people are taking opioids for pain connected with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases. Current analysis from Catalonia, Spain convincingly shows that the consumption of opioids in patients with osteoarthritis (OA/arthrosis) in 2007 to 2016 increased from 15 to 25 percent in all patients recorded.
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Vision loss influences perception of sound
People with severe vision loss can less accurately judge the distance of nearby sounds, potentially putting them more at risk of injury, according to new research published in the journal "Scientific Reports".
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Multifunctional e-glasses monitor health, protect eyes, control video game
Fitness tracker bracelets and watches provide useful information, such as step count and heart rate, but they usually can't provide more detailed data about the wearer's health. Now, researchers have developed smart e-glasses that not only monitor a person's brain waves and body movements, but also can function as sunglasses and allow users to control a video game with eye motions.
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Kirigami grips could help seniors keep their footing
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and MIT have developed pop-up shoe grips, inspired by snake skin, that can increase friction between the shoe and the ground. The assistive grips could be used, among other things, to reduce the risk of falling among older adults.
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