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News at REHACARE.com

New rehabilitation applications thanks to squeezy and soft sensing devices?
Imperial College London bioengineers have found a way to create stretchy and squeezy soft sensing devices by bonding rubber to electrical components.
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IPC stages accessibility workshop in Bonn
The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) hosted an Accessibility Workshop in Bonn, Germany to discuss with various stakeholders on how to collectively improve on accessibility and inclusion within the Movement.
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Diabetes: Eating in sync with biological clock could replace problematic treatment
Type 2 diabetics inject themselves with insulin, a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into liver, muscle and fat cells, up to four times a day. But insulin injections are linked to weight gain and the loss of control of blood sugar levels. This triggers a vicious cycle of higher insulin doses, continuous weight gain, a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease and other complications.
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Moderate intensity physical activity associated with lower risk of diabetes
Daily exercise at moderate intensity is associated with beneficial levels of a hormone that may lower risk of diabetes, according to a study published in Endocrine Connections. Men who were physically active at moderate intensity for 30 minutes a day, released higher levels of a hormone that reduces appetite and blood sugar levels.
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Improved fitness can mean living longer without dementia
Staying fit or improving fitness over time should be a goal for anyone who wants to reduce the likelihood of getting dementia.
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Mobile stroke units could expedite treatment and improve patient outcomes in urban areas
Mobile Stroke Units (MSUs), vehicles equipped to provide stroke treatment before reaching a hospital, provided lifesaving care to stroke patients in Manhattan approximately 30 minutes faster, compared to patients transported to hospitals in traditional ambulances and who did not receive stroke treatment until arriving at the hospital.
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Micro implants could restore standing and walking
When Vivian Mushahwar first applied to grad school, she wrote about her idea to fix paralysis by rewiring the spinal cord. It was only after she was accepted into a bioengineering program that the young electrical engineer learned her idea had actually prompted laughter.
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Dry, warm air increases the risk of stroke
Based on almost 18,000 cases collected over a period of ten years, an Augsburg study shows that the risk of certain types of stroke increases in dry and warm air masses. This is the first time such complex interactions with so many cases and subtypes have been investigated.
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People who cannot read may be more likely to develop dementia
According to the United States Department of Education, approximately 32 million adults in the country are illiterate, meaning they never learned to read or write. New research has found that people who are illiterate may have nearly three times greater risk of developing dementia than people who can read and write.
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How movements affect the processing of visual stimuli
How do we perceive our environment? What is the influence of sensory stimuli on the peripheral nervous system and what on the brain? Science has an interest in this question for many reasons. In the long term, insights from this research could contribute to a better understanding of diseases such as ADHD and Parkinson's disease.
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Inaccessible application forms are a barrier
Inaccessible application forms mean that nearly a third of people with a learning disability found it hard to apply for jobs, according to Mencap’s new survey of 1625 adults with a learning disability in the UK.
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Retinal screening in diabetes: diagnosis by robot
The digital revolution in ophthalmology, foreshadowed around two years ago, has now become a clinical reality: Since the middle of the year, MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital have been using automatic digital retinal screening, without assistance from an ophthalmologist, to detect diabetic retinal disease.
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Virtual reality would make attending therapy easier for stroke survivors
Researchers have created a virtual reality clinic to make it easier for stroke survivors to attend their physical and occupational therapy sessions. Results from a proof-of-concept study suggest that the technology - and the social connection it facilitates - are effective at encouraging therapy participation.
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Skin-integrated VR device shows great potential for prostheses control
A research team of scientists and engineers from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and Northwestern University in the United States has developed a skin-integrated virtual reality (VR) system, which can be controlled and powered wirelessly. The innovation has great application potential in communications, prosthetic control and rehabilitation, as well as gaming and entertainment.
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Teaching group work to students with autism
Children with autism have an obvious disadvantage in starting and carrying meaningful conversations with their peers. A study with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder showed that through a structured protocol of group work with typical peers these children were able to increase significantly their social interactions.
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Immersion in virtual reality scenes of the Arctic helps to ease people's pain
Watching immersive 360 videos of icy Arctic scenes helps to relieve intense burning pain and could hold hope for treating chronic pain, a small study has found.
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ETH plans competence centre for holistic rehabilitation
ETH researchers are planning to partner with clinics, foundations, public authorities and other institutions through a broad-​based initiative aimed at improving the quality of life and participation of people with physical disabilities.
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New 'bike helmet' style brain scanner used with children for first time
A new wearable 'bike helmet' style brain scanner, that allows natural movement during scanning, has been used in a study with young children for the first time. This marks an important step towards improving our understanding of brain development in childhood.
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Sleep and sleepiness 'a huge problem' for people with spinal cord injury
A new study led by a University of Calgary researcher at the Cumming School of Medicine (CSM) finds that fatigue and sleep may need more attention in order to prevent issues like stroke after spinal cord injury.
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A rail system allows child seat to be simply attached to the wheelchair
Taking a child along in a wheelchair is not an easy task for people with walking disabilities. Within the framework of several student projects, young engineers at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern (TUK) have dealt with this topic.
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Living in a noisy area increases the risk of suffering a more serious stroke
The high levels of environmental noise we are subjected to in large cities can increase both the severity and consequences of an ischaemic stroke. More precisely, researchers put the increased risk at 30 percent for people living in noisier areas.
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European digital inclusion strategies
The 2nd M-Enabling Forum Europe took place on September 19, 2019 at the Congress Center of Messe Düsseldorf during REHACARE. The conference demonstrated the importance of promoting digital inclusion and accessible and assistive technology for persons with disabilities and senior citizens.
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Quality over quantity! Interval walking training improves fitness and health
Interval Walking Training is a method that is effective in increasing overall fitness and decreasing healthcare costs associated with lifestyle-related diseases of the middle-aged and elderly. That's the result of a study of Dr. Shizue Masuki of Shinshu University.
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Researchers find high-intensity exercise improves memory in seniors
Researchers at McMaster University who examine the impact of exercise on the brain have found that high-intensity workouts improve memory in older adults.
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Teens with autism can master daily living skills when using video-prompting
As adults, individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be highly dependent on family members or assistance programs for their day-to-day living needs. Research has shown that people with ASD are strong visual learners. With technological advances, devices such as smart phones and tablets have become more portable and ultimately, accessible to caregivers.
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