Image: Two women sit across a table, one pets a furry seal plushie, one looks at a monitor; Copyright: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

A furry social robot can reduce pain and increase happiness

03/07/2020

According to a new study by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers published in Scientific Reports, a one-time, hour-long session with a plush, seal-like social robot reduced pain and oxytocin levels, and increased happiness. The Japanese social robot, PARO, emits seal-like sounds and moves its head and flippers in response to being spoken to and touched.
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Image: A woman wears a white round sensor at her arm and uses a CGM device to measure her blood glucose; Copyright: PantherMedia/Click_and_Photo

CGM reduces hypoglycemia in older adults with type 1 diabetes

01/07/2020

Results from a six-month, multi-site clinical trial called the Wireless Innovation for Seniors with Diabetes Mellitus (WISDM) Study Group have been published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
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Image: A young woman is doing exercises with small weights while doing sidesteps; Copyright: PantherMedia/AllaSerebrina

Options to treat MS-related cognitive impairment evaluated

29/06/2020

Experts in cognitive research evaluated the status of available treatments as well as promising strategies for treating cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis. The article, "Treatment and management of cognitive dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis", was published in Nature Reviews.
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Photo: Gabrial Diaz with a woman using virtual reality glasses; Copyright: A. Sue Weisler

Virtual reality to help stroke patients regain lost vision

24/06/2020

Scientists from Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester aim to use virtual reality to help restore vision for people with stroke-induced blindness. The team of researchers led by Gabriel Diaz received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a method they believe could revolutionize rehabilitation for patients with cortically induced blindness.
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Photo: Dr. Kevin Griffith showing some graphics at the computer; Copyright: Mackenzie Adams

Diabetes: Patient data can predict life expectancy

24/06/2020

A new study finds that clinicians can use patient data, such as a history of co-occurring health conditions and medication, to predict the 5- and 10-year life expectancy of older people with diabetes.
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Photo: Robotic hand typing on a laptop; Copyright: PantherMedia/ktsdesign

AI reduces communication gap for nonverbal people by as much as half

22/06/2020

Researchers have used artificial intelligence to reduce the communication gap for nonverbal people with motor disabilities who rely on computers to converse with others. The team developed a new context-aware method that reduces this communication gap by eliminating between 50 percent and 96 percent of the keystrokes the person has to type to communicate.
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Photo: Man in a wheelchair using a training device during rehabilitation; Copyright: PantherMedia/yacobchuk1

Time-saving high-intensity workouts can benefit people with spinal cord injuries

17/06/2020

Research from the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University has found that the practical advantages of high-intensity interval training (HIIT), or short bursts of all-out exercise, could be especially beneficial for people who have experienced spinal cord injuries (SCI).
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Photo: Elderly woman wearing a nose and mouth protective mask against the Coronavirus; Copyright: PantherMedia/TaniaBertoni

COVID-19: Responding to challenges of older adults after infection

17/06/2020

Older adults with COVID-19 who survive hospitalizations and return to their homes confront substantial health challenges and an unpredictable future. Early evidence suggests that complex and long-term physical, functional, cognitive, and emotional negative health consequences will be the norm for them.
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Photo: Close up of a violin and a sheet of music; Copyright: PantherMedia/billiondigital

Mozart may reduce seizure frequency in people with epilepsy

15/06/2020

A new clinical research study by Dr. Marjan Rafiee and Dr. Taufik Valiante of the Krembil Brain Institute at Toronto Western Hospital, part of University Health Network, has found that a Mozart composition may reduce seizure frequency in patients with epilepsy.
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Graphic: Structure of the artificial eye with 3D retina; Copyright: HKUST

Scientists develop world's first spherical artificial eye with 3D retina

15/06/2020

An international team led by scientists at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has recently developed the world's first 3D artificial eye with capabilities better than existing bionic eyes and in some cases, even exceed those of the human eyes, bringing vision to humanoid robots and new hope to patients with visual impairment.
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Photo: Head of a depressed elderly woman with a hand on her shoulder; Copyright: PantherMedia/photographee

Repetitive negative thinking linked to dementia risk

10/06/2020

Persistently engaging in negative thinking patterns may raise the risk of Alzheimer's disease, finds a new UCL-led study. In the study of people aged over 55, published in Alzheimer's & Dementia, researchers found 'repetitive negative thinking' (RNT) is linked to subsequent cognitive decline as well as the deposition of harmful brain proteins linked to Alzheimer's.
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Photo: Girl with several electrodes on her head, in front of her a monitor showing brain signals; Copyright: PantherMedia/yacobchuk1

Stimulating research gives new treatment hope for Tourette Syndrome

10/06/2020

Scientists from the University of Nottingham's School of Psychology and School of Medicine used repetitive trains of stimulation to the median nerve (MNS) at the wrist to entrain rhythmic electrical brain activity - known as brain-oscillations - that are associated with the suppression of movements.
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Photo: hands of an older person, one hand massaging the other; Copyright: PantherMedia/Astrid Gast

Rheumatic pain: increasingly more patients taking opioids

08/06/2020

Fentanyl, tramadol or tilidine: New European figures show that even in Europe increasingly more people are taking opioids for pain connected with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases. Current analysis from Catalonia, Spain convincingly shows that the consumption of opioids in patients with osteoarthritis (OA/arthrosis) in 2007 to 2016 increased from 15 to 25 percent in all patients recorded.
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Photo: An older man lies on the ground and presses a hand to his head, his wife kneels next to him and calls an ambulance; Copyright: PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

Coronavirus linked to stroke in otherwise healthy young people

08/06/2020

Young patients with no risk factors for stroke may have an increased risk if they have contracted COVID-19, whether or not they are showing symptoms of the disease. Surgeons at Thomas Jefferson University and collaborators analyzed patients presenting with stroke from March 20th until April 10th at their institutions. The strokes they observed were unlike what they usually see.
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Photo: Physician checking the eyes of an elderly man; Copyright: PantherMedia/minervastock

Vision loss influences perception of sound

05/06/2020

People with severe vision loss can less accurately judge the distance of nearby sounds, potentially putting them more at risk of injury, according to new research published in the journal "Scientific Reports".
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Image: Child with cerebral palsy with a walking aid; Copyright: PantherMedia/jarenwicklund

How a network of hospitals reduced average age at cerebral palsy diagnosis to 9.5 months

02/06/2020

More than 50 percent of all eventual cerebral palsy (CP) cases spend time in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, making early CP evaluation a crucial element of any hospital's high-risk follow-up program. The earlier children are diagnosed, the better their chances of early access to evidence-based interventions targeted specifically for CP.
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Photo: Elderly woman in a meditation pose; Copyright: PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

Spirituality linked to higher quality of life for stroke survivors and caregivers

29/05/2020

Higher spirituality among stroke survivors was strongly linked to better quality of life for them and their caregivers who may also feel depressed, according to new research published in "Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes", an American Heart Association journal. May is American Stroke Month.
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Photo: Pencil drawing of an eye, which is partly erased; Copyright: PantherMedia/lightsource

'Time is vision' after a stroke

27/05/2020

A person who has a stroke that causes vision loss is often told there is nothing she can do to improve or regain the vision she has lost. New research from the University of Rochester, published in the journal Brain, may offer hope to stroke patients in regaining vision.
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