Photo: Young child having MEG brain scan whilst interacting with mum; Copyright: Prof. Rebeccah Slater

New 'bike helmet' style brain scanner used with children for first time

18.11.2019

A new wearable 'bike helmet' style brain scanner, that allows natural movement during scanning, has been used in a study with young children for the first time. This marks an important step towards improving our understanding of brain development in childhood.
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Photo: Phillips Lab of Cumming School of Medicine investigates sleep and its impact; Copyright: Kelly Johnston, Cumming School of Medicine

Sleep and sleepiness 'a huge problem' for people with spinal cord injury

18.11.2019

A new study led by a University of Calgary researcher at the Cumming School of Medicine (CSM) finds that fatigue and sleep may need more attention in order to prevent issues like stroke after spinal cord injury.
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Photo: Michael Weber (left) and Johannes Imhoff presenting their child seat for wheelchairs ; Copyright: Koziel/TUK

A rail system allows child seat to be simply attached to the wheelchair

15.11.2019

Taking a child along in a wheelchair is not an easy task for people with walking disabilities. Within the framework of several student projects, young engineers at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern (TUK) have dealt with this topic.
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Photo: An usual rush hour traffic situation in a big city; Copyright: PantherMedia/chungking

Living in a noisy area increases the risk of suffering a more serious stroke

13.11.2019

The high levels of environmental noise we are subjected to in large cities can increase both the severity and consequences of an ischaemic stroke. More precisely, researchers put the increased risk at 30 percent for people living in noisier areas.
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Photo: Female Participant doing Interval Walking Training; Copyright: Shizue Masuki, Shinshu University

Quality over quantity! Interval walking training improves fitness and health

11.11.2019

Interval Walking Training is a method that is effective in increasing overall fitness and decreasing healthcare costs associated with lifestyle-related diseases of the middle-aged and elderly. That's the result of a study of Dr. Shizue Masuki of Shinshu University.
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Photo: McMaster undergraduate student Ronald Perinpanayagam works with one of the seniors who participated in the study; Copyright: Paulina Rzeczkowska

Researchers find high-intensity exercise improves memory in seniors

11.11.2019

Researchers at McMaster University who examine the impact of exercise on the brain have found that high-intensity workouts improve memory in older adults.
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Photo: A poster that says

November 2019: Quo vadis inclusion?

07.11.2019

Ten years ago, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities came into force in Germany. There is still considerable criticism of the current state of its implementation. The hope for a more inclusive society has not yet been fulfilled. But what about the rest of Europe? REHACARE.com has set out on a search – for positive developments, but also for obstacles still to be overcome.
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Photo: A man working on a keyboard for the visually impaired; Copyright: Andi Weiland | Boehringer Ingelheim, Gesellschaftsbilder.de

It is not only in digital form that the diversity of people must be recognized and taken into account!

07.11.2019

Sweden is a pioneer in many things. But the Scandinavian country does not represent Europe. However, there is also no country that can be regarded as a positive overall example in the topic of Inclusion. Susanna Laurin from Funka knows why digital accessibility is a way to participate and why research in the field of disabilities and information and communication technology is so important.
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Photo: A child and a grown up man with Down syndrome in a park; Copyright: PantherMedia/nd3000

High rates of dementia amongst people with Down syndrome

06.11.2019

Not so many years ago, people with Down syndrome rarely survived to middle age. Many died young due to heart problems associated with the congenital condition.Today, advances in treatment have allowed them to live longer, healthier lives. But these advances have also revealed a previously unknown characteristic of the condition: increased risk for dementia and Alzheimer's disease.
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Photo: Actimetry sensor in a wristwatch-like device on a wrist; Copyright: Peng Li/Brigham and Women's Hospital

Predicting frailty, disability and death

06.11.2019

Using a wristwatch-like device, researchers detected fluctuations in the daily motor activity of older adults that could predict increased risk of deteriorated quality of life or death years later.
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Photo: Patient doing a gait analysis; Copyright: PantherMedia/SimpleFoto

Looking at the way we walk can help predict cognitive decline

04.11.2019

The way people walk is an indicator of how much their brains, as well as their bodies, are aging. Scientists reporting say that gait disorders, particularly slowing gait, should be considered a marker of future cognitive decline. They propose testing motor performance as well as cognitive performance in older adults with mild cognitive impairments.
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Image: Group vector design of business workforces; Copyright: PantherMedia/Ramcreative

Risk factors for unemployment with multiple sclerosis vary by age

04.11.2019

A recent study by Kessler Foundation researchers explored numerous factors that contribute to the high unemployment rate among individuals of different ages with multiple sclerosis (MS). This is the first investigation to consider age within the context of disease- and person-specific factors affecting employment in MS.
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Photo: Example of gaze fixation points; Copyright: Ben-Gurion University

Tracking gaze patterns might help detecting autism

01.11.2019

Measuring children's gaze patterns as they watch movies of social interactions is a reliable way to accurately identify nearly half of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) cases, according to a new study just published in Autism Research by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers.
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Photo: Young man in the Icaros flight simulator; Copyright: German Sport University Cologne

Rehabilitation: Exergaming with Icaros

30.10.2019

Studies show significant correlations between periods spent sitting and the prevalence of chronic diseases. This also applies to children and adolescents. One of the major obstacles to people taking up physical exercise is a lack of motivation. The solution could be Icaros: a flight simulator with exergaming technology that promises the user an element of fun while at the same time keeping fit.
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Photo: Young man during the acoustic emission demonstration; Copyright: Lancaster University

Listening to 'noisy knees' to diagnose osteoarthritis

25.10.2019

A new way of diagnosing and assessing knee osteoarthritis (OA) has moved a step closer with a major study paving the way for its use in research and clinical practice. The technique involves attaching small microphones to knees, and detecting high frequency sounds from the joint components as people perform sitting standing movements.
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Graphic: Information graphic about the advantages of the robotic suit; Copyright: Chung-Ang University

Lightweight, portable robotic suit to increase running and walking performance

23.10.2019

While walking may not seem like a burden for most people, for others, this simple task can often feel exhausting. For patients recovering from surgery or stroke, those with Parkinson's Disease, those with restricted mobility walking or running can be a struggle. Many researchers have pondered over this problem over the years, developing a number of external devices.
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Image: Virtual reality background with a wheelchair user wearing virtual reality glasses; Copyright: TOYOHASHI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

Virtual walking system for re-experiencing the journey of another person

23.10.2019

A research team in Japan has developed a virtual walking system with focusing on vision and foot vibrations, because these modalities seem critical and a minimal set to induce walking sensations. This system records a person walking, then re-plays it to another user through the oscillating optic flow and synchronous foot vibrations.
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Photo: Mother interacting with her baby; Copyright: PantherMedia/MilanMarkovic78 (YAYMicro)

Deaf infants' gaze behavior more advanced than that of hearing infants

21.10.2019

Deaf infants who have been exposed to American Sign Language are better at following an adult's gaze than their hearing peers, supporting the idea that social-cognitive development is sensitive to different kinds of life experiences.
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Photo: An elderly couple petting their dog outdoors; Copyright: PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Dementia: Non-pharmacologic treatments more effective for psychiatric symptoms

18.10.2019

For patients with dementia who have symptoms of aggression and agitation, interventions such as outdoor activities, massage and touch therapy may be more effective treatments than medication in some cases, suggests a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
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Photo: Young man lying on a bed in a heatsuit; Copyright: Loughborough University

Heated suit simulates exercise benefits for people unable to take part in physical activity

16.10.2019

A team from Loughborough University is using the prototype device to help people with disabilities, elderly people, and those with chronic diseases that prevent them from taking part in exercise. It comes following a successful study into how hot baths can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes.
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Photo: Man with lower back pain; Copyright: PantherMedia/lightwavemedia

Study questions 'cross-transfer' benefits of special exercise technique

16.10.2019

A paper recently published by researchers from the Ohio Musculoskeletal and Neurological Institute (OMNI) at the Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine questions the effectiveness of a patented exercise system for relieving lower back pain.
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Photo: Robot with artificial skin is touched by a hand; Copyright: Astrid Eckert/TUM

Biologically-inspired artificial skin improves sensory ability of robots

14.10.2019

Sensitive synthetic skin enables robots to sense their own bodies and surroundings – a crucial capability if they are to be in close contact with people. Inspired by human skin, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a system combining artificial skin with control algorithms and used it to create the first autonomous humanoid robot with full-body artificial skin.
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Photo: Patient in hospital bed during dialysis; Copyright: Fraunhofer IZI/Dr. Rainer Goldau

Affordable and mobile purification of dialysis water

14.10.2019

For patients who undergo dialysis, this artificial washing of the blood is a major burden. To remove toxins from the blood, large quantities of dialysis water for clearance are required. Until now there has been no solution so far to recover this dialysate cost-effectively. Therefore a cryo-purification method is being developed by Fraunhofer researchers that clears the water without loosing it.
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Photo: Elderly people during a yoga session; Copyright: PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Chair yoga more effective than music therapy in older adults with advanced dementia

11.10.2019

As dementia progresses, the ability to participate in exercise programs declines. Sticking to a program also becomes challenging because of impaired cognition, mobility issues or risk of falls and fractures – some exercise regimens are just too complicated or physically demanding.
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Photo: Microfluidic cartridge for on-site analysis; Copyright: BiFlow Systems GmbH

Better treatment for diabetic foot ulcers

09.10.2019

People with type 2 diabetes often live with poorly-healing infected wounds on their feet. Using existing methods, however, it takes two days to grow a bacterial culture used to identify the pathogens infecting the wound and their antibiotic resistance – and thus to find an effective antibiotic. With the help of a new rapid test, it will take just one hour to obtain this information in the future.
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Photo: Mother lying on a bed with her child and holding a smartphone in her hand to make a selfie; Copyright: PantherMedia/Bodler

Prototype smartphone app can help parents detect early signs of eye disorders in children

09.10.2019

A Baylor University researcher's prototype smartphone app – designed to help parents detect early signs of various eye diseases in their children such as retinoblastoma, an aggressive pediatric eye cancer – has passed its first big test.
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Photo: Dario Bortolotti adjusts the insole and smart electronics on the prosthesis; Copyright: Stanisa Raspopovic

Leg amputees feel and use the prosthesis as a real limb

07.10.2019

Tiny electrodes implanted in the patients' thigh nerve allow them to feel natural sensations of touch and movement from the prosthesis. Therefore, the amputees can walk freely while thinking about different activities other than controlling the device.
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Photo: Woman with a smartphone in her hand next to her ear; Copyright: PantherMedia/Iñigo Quintanilla

Dementia: Phone check-in may mean less depression for caring relatives

07.10.2019

A monthly, 40-minute phone call from a non-clinical professional may suppress or reverse the trajectory of depression so frequently experienced by family members caring for patients with dementia at home, according to a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco.
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Photo: Screenshot of the videogame Pico's Adventure, level 3; Copyright: UPF

Autism: Full-body interaction videogames enhance social skills in children

04.10.2019

Narcís Parés, a member of the Cognitive Media Technologies research group of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies (DTIC) at UPF, is working on a research line known as "full-body interaction". At his laboratory, he designs different applications based on such interaction in order to study the mediation of experiences.
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Photo: A kind of Lego robot and a child's hand that has the control for it on its wrist; Copyright: PantherMedia/yacobchuk1

October 2019: Research & development

01.10.2019

Basic research, technology development, and the development of a prototype to a marketable product - these are the steps that innovations go through before we can use them. REHACARE.de has looked around which promising tools could soon conquer the market for blind people and how a FabLab project tries to implement digital participation for all.
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Photo: A kind of Lego robot and a child's hand that has the control for it on its wrist; Copyright: PantherMedia/yacobchuk1

The basis for innovation: research and development

01.10.2019

Basic research, technology development, and the development of a prototype to a marketable product - these are the steps that innovations go through before we can use them. REHACARE.de has looked around which promising tools could soon conquer the market for blind people and how a FabLab project tries to implement digital participation for all.
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Photo: A woman and a man are watching the 3D printing process; Copyright: PantherMedia/Monkeybusiness Images

Leveraging research and development to shape the future

01.10.2019

Whether it’s wheelchairs or prosthetics – there is an ongoing effort to continuously improve auxiliary aids and services. As a result, the standards of medical equipment also continue to change - always based on the latest developments and research results. That’s why REHACARE.com has taken a closer look at how trends like digitization and creative minds impact this industry sector.
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Photo: The Canute 360 Braille eReader in use; Copyright: Bristol Braille Technology

Two innovative ideas expected to breathe new life into Braille

01.10.2019

Braille was invented nearly 195 years ago. The system has helped people to effectively participate at home and in society and acquire higher education ever since. It remains a reliable system that facilitates inclusion today. However, when it comes to Braille reader advancements, current technology is not nearly as up to date. Two projects plan to change that.
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Photo: Wheelchair user Verena Barwitz with Holger Dieterich and Matthias Heil at the re:publica 2018; Copyright: Andi Weiland | Gesellschaftsbilder.de

Daimler’s WheelPilot app finds accessible destinations

01.07.2019

Navigation systems are not a new invention. But what if an app for accessible destinations could be connected straight to your vehicle, thus making mobility easier for people with disabilities? The creative, innovative minds of Daimler AG’s Lab1886 challenged themselves to make it reality. That marked the birth of WheelPilot.
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Photo: Prototype of the sensor for a cane; Copyright: Zahout-Heil

SmAccLab: Smart auxiliary means for everyone

28.05.2019

Accessible and realistic – that’s how auxiliary aids should be in the eyes of Professor Carsten Zahout. Students at the Smart Accessibility Laboratory (SmAccLab) are working on technical solutions that fulfill these requirements and lead to increased participation for people with disabilities. REHACARE.com found out how product engineering and inclusion join forces.
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Photo: An elderly woman catches ichó. The ball starts to glow in red-orange colors.; Copyright: ichó systems - icho-systems.de

"ichó brings people with and without dementia together and provides a way to share stories, experiences, and impressions."

22.04.2018

Like the golden sphere in the fairy tale of the Frog King, ichó (Greek for echo) is meant to bring back lost motor skills and cognitive functions to people with dementia. The project of four former graduates of the Düsseldorf University of Applied Sciences aims to offer individual support through a person’s favorite music or fairy tale.
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Photo: Cinderella and Niels of HelpCamps; Copyright: HelpCamps

HelpCamps: "Making assistive technology faster, more affordable and personalized"

23.11.2017

In accordance with the slogan "Nothing about us without us", the HelpCamps project aims at developing and implementing concepts and ideas together. To make this a reality, people with disabilities, companies from the assistive technology, care and assistance sectors, as well as stakeholders in the so-called maker movement and researchers, are brought together to network during various events.
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Photo: Marcus Rohrbach cuts fruits in kitchen, camera records scenes, computer screen in foreground

Will software automatically describe movie plots in the near future?

18.07.2016

In order to understand the plot of a movie an audio version is very helpful for visually impaired people. Authors watch the whole movies and describe what happens in each scene. But wouldn’t it be possible for a computer software to do this kind of work? Researchers work on developing a program which automatically generates movie descriptions and reads them out.
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